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  1. #1
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    Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    G'day all, I have files brought back from a UNIX machine by FTP that after arriving in Word have a lot of Latin lower-case y diaeresis characters - i.e. a y with two adjacent dots, or umlaut sign above it - that I would dearly love to replace with blank or null characters. Any help would be appreciated.

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    In one document, you could do it as follows:

    Select Edit | Replace... (or press Ctrl+H)
    In the Find What box, type

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    If you have time for a comparison, can you tell what those characters were before the change of file systems converted them around? The answer might not help you avoid the problem in the future, but just maybe it can be cured with some kind of encoding setting.

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Hi Perc,

    Probably you're out of luck, and the

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Thanks Klaus! The diaeresis characters WERE all ASCII zeroes, and using "Find ^000" in the dialog (instead of cutting and pasting the character from the document) worked perfectly. Am I correct in thinking that I can use ^0nn to find any ASCII character nn in a Word document?

    Regards,
    Peter

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Yes, but it's a bit tricky.

    For characters with codes below 128, you can search for ^###.
    (These "ASCII" codes are the same in DOS and Windows code pages, and Unicode)

    Between 128 and 255, you need to use ^0### with a leading zero.
    Without the leading zero, Word uses an old DOS code page.
    With the leading zero, it uses the old Windows code page 1252 for those codes.

    For codes above 255, you need to use ^u#### (for example ^u960 to search for the greek letter pi).

    <img src=/S/cheers.gif border=0 alt=cheers width=30 height=16> Klaus

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Hi Klaus:
    Offhand, do you know where I can get a complete list of all the codes? I notice that if I press Alt+155, I get the

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    (I use Word2000 on Win98; other versions might differ a bit, and most (or all) of it is probably more an OS issue than a Word issue)
    As I said, Alt+0128 to Alt0255 (or ^0128 to ^0255 in Edit > Find/Replace) uses the codes from the Windows CP1252.
    I'm not sure if that is true for all language versions; probably a Russian or Greek Windows would use their Windows code page.
    For a display of that code page, see for example this PDF from AgfaMonotype.com.

    The DOS code page that's used for Alt+128 to Alt+255 (or for ^128 to ^255 in Edit > Find/Replace) is probably CP850 (Multilingual Latin 1).
    For a list, see for example this page from Kosta Kostis
    Though: you can't get all characters, such as the block characters, but only those that are in the Windows CP1252 too. So it isn't much use, except to save one key stroke.
    BTW saving key strokes: DOS used codes below 32 for control characters, but some corresponded to characters at least in some DOS applications. So you can still use
    Alt+15 =

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Oh, and Alt+9 is a tab (works in tables, too, where usually you need to use Ctrl+Tab instead of the Tab key).
    And Alt+8 is the Backspace key; though the old DOS tricks involving the backspace key won't work any more (such as "u" and Alt+8 and "_" to get an underlined "u") <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>

    <img src=/S/cheers.gif border=0 alt=cheers width=30 height=16> Klaus

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    And - sadly - Alt 7 doesn't ring the Bell like in the good old days of ASCII codes.

    StuartR

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Thanks, Klaus. I'm not familiar with the "CP" book that you're referring to (I take it that means "Code Page"). I'll look on Amazon for it.

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Sorry Phil, my English isn't too good. Yes, CP stands for "Code Page", but I wasn't referring to any book.

    A code page is just a list that describes what caracters are on which code position. Usually, they are defined by standard bodies such as ANSI, but the Windows code pages were defined by Microsoft.

    The lower half of the code pages (codes ^000 to ^127) used to be the same in DOS, Windows, Mac code pages and other operating systems.
    Those characters are often called 7-bit ASCII characters.
    The upper half is usually different in every code page.
    The two links in my last post have the relevant code pages.

    At www.unicode.org, you'll find lists for the codes of characters in Unicode.
    Unicode usually has two bytes available for every character, so it can easily describe 256

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Hehe... yes.

    The first programs I ever wrote (on a Commodore PET) printed strings consisting of block elements or box drawing characters and ^8 (Backspace) to the screen in a loop.

    It looked like worms that marched across the screen, contracting and expanding as they went along.

    <img src=/S/cheers.gif border=0 alt=cheers width=30 height=16> Klaus

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    Re: Replacing diaeresis characters (Word 2000, SP3)

    Thanks for all this, Klaus. I've gotten everything but the Unicode list & I'm sure I'll find it on their site.
    Cheers,

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