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  1. #1
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    Handling orphaned paragraphs on last page of doc (2000)

    What's the best way to make the last page of a document look nice when the
    normal layout of the document would leave a couple of short paragraphs on
    the last page?

    I've tried applying the "justified" setting to the "vertical alignment"
    layout option, but that seems to just space out the paragraphs on a per page
    basis. In other words, if there were 3 one line paragraphs on the last page,
    it spaces them so that each paragraph is about a third of the page apart.
    What I'd like to do is to have Word take all the paragraphs in the entire
    document, and repaginate the whole document so that all the paragraphs are
    evenly spaced and so that the last page has a reasonable number of lines on
    it.

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Handling orphaned paragraphs on last page of doc (2000)

    Word doesn't have this feature. You can try to simulate it. Using Print Layout mode, go to the last page. Assuming all your paragraphs have the same style (e.g., Body Text) - if they don't, this won't work correctly - open Format>Style, highlight the style, and use Modify>Format>Paragraph by increasing the Space Before and/or Space After setting. This will incrementally space your paragraphs further apart. Repeat until you reach the desired look.

  3. #3
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    Re: Handling orphaned paragraphs on last page of

    One thing you can do, since you basically want to repaginate the whole document is:
    1. Go to Print Preview (Ctrl+F2) & click on the "shrink to fit" button. Basically, it will change the font size by 1/2 of a point to make all the text fit on one less page. Note that you are applying direct formatting to your paragraphs, so you have the disadvantages of not using a style.

    After doing that, you could reformat each style in the document to match by placing the cursor in each style of paragraph (once for each style), then clicking in the style box & press <enter>. You'll be given a couple of options & one is to update the style; select that one. Repeat for each style.

    2. You could change the margins slightly & let Word repaginate the document. This would be a trial & error method, but would probably not be very noticeable if your document is more than a few pages.

    Cheers,

  4. #4
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    Re: Handling orphaned paragraphs on last page of doc (2000)

    The best solution to the problem will vary depending on additional layout considerations.

    If you are using double-spaced text (as with an author's manuscript), a good answer may be to tinker with the vertical line spacing ((Format Paragraph dialog) -- specifying either "1.5 lines" instead of "double" or using the "Exactly" option and specifying a specific number of points. As has been mentioned, for best visual effect this should be done either for the whole document at once (Select All) or via modifying the relevant style(s).

    Single-spaced text (as in a book or letter) will be trickier. The "Shrink To Fit" option available in Print Preview is one possibility, as mentioned already -- but it may not be the only one, or the best one. If you don't want to alter the general margin settings for the document, one approach might be to fiddle with the paragraph formats of any page headers or footers -- say, increase the Space After a header, or add a blank paragraph mark -- as that will effectively decrease the available space per page consistently across the document.

    Mind you, there are yet other ways to approach the problem. When this happens in my own manuscripts, I am frequently motivated to look closely at the text to see if I can trim a word or two somewhere so as to reduce the text by a line -- but that answer, of course, may not be possible if you're working with someone else's text.
    "What's loved, survives." (Diane Duane, Deep Wizardry)

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