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  1. #1
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    old replicated access database (2000)

    I have taken over a database file that has been created who knows when. There are a lot of changes I have to make to the forms that it creates and I need to add new tables to it as well. The trouble I am having is that all the files are "replicated" and the original access database files are no longer in existence I don't want to have to recreated the over 6000 record and at least 10 tables that combine. is there anyway I can delete the replication of data. I attempted to make a new table and try to delete to columns that were replicated but it isn't telling me all the columns that are... Any help in this matter is appreciated. <img src=/S/help.gif border=0 alt=help width=23 height=15>

    Theresa

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Hi Theresa,
    You probably want to look at <!mskb=208394>Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 208394<!/mskb> which tells you how to turn a replicated database into a regular database. It isn't lots of fun, but it can be done - I've done it twice.
    Wendell

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Pat,

    Check out <!profile=WendellB>WendellB<!/profile>'s website (link is in his profile), and select Support > Tutorials.
    Also ACC2000: Jet 4.0 Replication White Papers Available in MSDN Online Library.

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Wendell, what's a good source to read up on Replication?

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Thanks Hans.

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    A couple of other resources if you can get your hands on them:
    Access Developer's Handbook - 2000 or 2002
    Alison Balter's Mastering Access 2002 Enterprise Development
    Wendell

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    If you have access to a copy of the Access 2000 Developer's Handbook, the CD-ROM that accompanies Volume 2 (Enterprise Edition) includes a free utility, the MCW Unreplicate Add-in (file name is UnReplicate2000.MDA). According to the CD's ReadMe file, "This free add-in will help you convert a replicated Access 2000 design master into an unreplicated database." I don't know how well the utility works, as I avoid replication - too many headaches. But if you have the ADH it may be worth trying. For more information on the Access & VBA Developer's Handbook series, check their site:

    Developer's Handbook website

    HTH

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Another option: Trigeminal Software, Inc (TSI) has a free utility available for download, TSI Access 2000 Un-Replicator, that can be used to unreplicate a replicated database. This is a VB COM add-in (.DLL file) you'd have to register on your PC to use. For details and download link check this link:

    TSI Access 2000 Un-Replicator

    HTH

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Hi Mark
    When you say
    >>as I avoid replication - too many headaches<<
    Would you tell me what headaches you have encountered with replication?
    Also how do you avoid where it, or something like it, is required?

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    My experience with replication is somewhat limited and have not used it in a while, so I'd recommend reading up on it in some of the references that were mentioned. Some of the "issues" I encountered in one case:

    - If you do development work on more than one computer, you will have to redesignate the copy you are working with as the Design Master every time you switch PC's. I switch back & forth between work & home PC's every day. All this switching back & forth w/the Design Master can lead to problems. If you use only one PC for development work this would not be an issue.

    - One of the .MDB's in the BE is updated monthly with external data by use of delete & append queries. Thousands of records are updated monthly. Replication is not designed to deal with this volume of changes; was unable to synchronize changes made in this fashion. The tables in this .MDB had to be excluded from the replication process.

    - Replication slows everything down to a noticeable degree, especially over a network, due to the overhead involved in maintaining all the replication tables & columns and keeping track of all the changes. File size is bloated for same reason.

    - Some synchronization conflicts could not be resolved.

    - If the db is secured, that will complicate things. Generally you would secure db first, replicate second, to avoid any issues in this regard.

    - As noted in this thread, its easier to replicate a database than it is to un-replicate it. Whatever you do always have a backup of the original, unreplicated db if you plan to "experiment" with replication.

    Issues aside, replication seemed to work as advertised, users were able to synchronize changes w/a minimum of "conflicts" (only a few users worked with replicated copies). In some cases it may be a good solution. As for how to avoid it (if required), don't have any brilliant suggestions. You could:

    - Put the db on the web (if practical) to allow remote access.

    - Create your own program to allow remote users to upload changes (aka reinventing the wheel).

    If I were in a situation where replication functionality was required, I think I'd go with one of the alternatives before using replication. As noted my experience with replication is limited, so my experiences may not be representative, you may want some comments from someone with more experience in this area.

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Thanks Mark, that certainly helps.

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    Thanks for all the links I'll let everyone know just how difficult this may be.

    Have a great day

    Theresa <img src=/S/clapping.gif border=0 alt=clapping width=19 height=23>

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    I'm back and pulling the hairs out. I have made a new database file and it seems to be ok so far but one problem. I can't find all the "indexes" and all the macros no longer work. I looked in The Microsoft Access 2000Replication FAQ and it stated that I could also just remove the enforced integrity relationship from the db file. Well neither of them worked well. In researching it further the original db file was created in Access97 and the copy i'm using is a 3rd copy made in Access2000. I am not a developer nor do I have enough knowledge in VB to edit. I can't access many of the wizards and when I look at the replication tab on the tool bar I don't have access to any of the commands other then create replication. So again I'm seeing help. Do I dump this database file and start all over... And is there anyway a non VB editor user can make the necessary changes and find the macros that were used to edit with ease? I am hoping that my company will send me to classes to learn VB editing but that doesn't seem likely. So any other advise is again appreciated.

    Theresa <img src=/S/hello.gif border=0 alt=hello width=25 height=29>

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    Re: old replicated access database (2000)

    First of all, was your replicated database split into a front-end and a back-end? If it was then you probably didn't have a replicated front-end, and all the macros and what were stored in the front-end. On the other hand, if it was all stored in one database, then the problem is more complex. In general what you want to do is import all of the objects (queries, forms, reports, macros and modules) into a new 2000 database, but don't include the tables. Then import the tables into a new back-end database, and link the front-end to the back-end tables. You will probably have to re-establish relational integrity in the back-end, and you will need to follow the steps outlined in the MS FAQ or in Access help to get rid of the replication fields. And you shouldn't expect to see anything other than Create replica in the Replication menu. Finally, if you really want to get into the macros (and modules), you may want to look at them using Access 97 (if you have that available).
    Wendell

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