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  1. #1
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    Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    I upgraded/flashed my AMI Bios on my MSI K7T 266 Pro II mb. Upgraded the Bios to version 3.7 (AMI 10/14/02) using the LiveUpdate 2 utility, which is supposed to make upgrading a "no-brainer". Chipset is a VIA VT8366A Apollo KT266A. CPU is an AMD Athlon XP 1.8. O/S Win XP Home SP-1a.

    I ran Diskeeper's "Boot-Time Defrag" tonight, which I normally do once a month. Upon reboot, ChkDisk runs first and then the Defrag. I got about 1/2 way through ChkDisk and got a BSOD with the following information:

    <font color=red> Message read something to the effect: Disable any "caching" or "shadowing" in the CMOS.

    Stop: 0x 0000007E (0xC0000005, 0xF8A7A51D, 0xF896DC83, 0xF896D938)

    FS_rec.sys - Address F8A7A51D Base at F8A7A000, DateStamp 367d8361</font color=red>

    Soooooo, what's all this mean? Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Jeff
    Jeff
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  2. #2
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    Re: Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    You need to go into your CMOS setup and Disable Caching and Shadowing.

    Also you can read this. Scroll Down and you will see the Caching and Shadowing Here

  3. #3
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    Re: Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    THis is very close to your error, it might help get you in a direction Stop: OxOOOOOO7E (OxcOOOOOOO5

  4. #4
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    Re: Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    Thanks, but although I do have a Logitech MX700 Mouse... I am running the 9.76 version drivers which is way beyond what the MSKB article is referring to. <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15> Besides, everything was working fine until I upgraded the Bios.

    Jeff
    Jeff
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  5. #5
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    Re: Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    Thanks for this too! I went into the CMOS and changed two items which I think are what the article referred to. There might have been others, but it was difficult to tell.

    1) Internal Cache was set to "WriteBack". I changed it to "Disable".
    2) C000, 32k Shadow was set to "Cached". I change it to "Disable"

    I then rebooted and I thought Windows was never going to load. Took over 10 minutes. So, I immediately went back and restored the defaults. Any wisdom here?

    Jeff
    Jeff
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  6. #6
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    Re: Problem after upgrading Bios (Problem after Bios upgrade)

    I would leave your Internal Catch enabled.
    From PC Guide
    Internal Cache

    This setting enables or disables the internal cache on your processor. This is also known as the L1 or level 1 cache. For 486 or later processors this should be enabled; turning off the level one cache will lead to a major performance hit. Earlier processors don't have internal cache, and enabling this setting can possibly lead to problems. You should disable this setting only for testing purposes if you are trying to find a problem, or if you suspect a bad processor chip.

    On some BIOSes you may see three choices: "Disabled", "Write Through" and "Write Back". These refer to the cache's write policy. The write back cache policy will produce the best performance.


    External Cache

    This setting enables or disables the external cache on your processor, also known as the L2 or level 2 cache. Most 486 or later motherboards include this cache memory. Like the internal cache setting, this should be enabled at all times unless you are disabling it for troubleshooting purposes. Disabling the external cache will cause your system to slow down dramatically, but you can use it if you are having system crashes and suspect a problem with the cache chips.

    Diable These:

    C8000-CBFFF Shadow, CC000-CFFFF Shadow, etc.

    Most BIOSes have several settings for shadowing each of the 16K blocks of RAM from C8000h through DFFFFh. These settings show up as something like "C8000-CBFFF Shadow", "CC000-CFFFF Shadow", etc., up to "DC000-DFFFF Shadow". Some systems have settings for ROM shadowing in 32K blocks instead of 16K, so you will see "C8000-CFFFF" instead of "C8000-CBFFF" and "CC000-CFFFF". (Some systems leave off the last digit in their notation, calling the blocks "C800-CBFF", etc. It's the same thing.)

    When enabled, the setting selected turns on adapter ROM shadowing for that 16K block of memory. See here for a full description of what ROM shadowing does; in short, it speeds up your system by copying the contents of any BIOS code found in adapters using this memory space, from the slow ROM in which it resides into faster RAM.

    The areas of memory from C8000 to DFFFFh are normally used by expansion cards such as network adapters. Turning on shadowing would speed these adapters up in the same way that shadowing the system BIOS speeds up the system BIOS code. However, things are much more tricky here, because some adapters use RAM as well as ROM, and map this RAM into this address space as well. If they do, and you enable shadowing, the adapter will malfunction because shadowing write-protects the RAM it uses (since it thinks it is emulating a ROM only, which cannot be rewritten). This can cause spurious results when using these cards, and can be very difficult to diagnose. In addition, normally unused areas of memory in this region are used as UMBs for loading drivers via the EMM386 driver, and enabling shadowing will cause this to malfunction.

    For this reason, the default for shadowing these adapter ROM areas is normally "Disabled" and I recommend that it be left that way in most cases. If you know all the details on the card whose ROM you are trying to shadow, enabling this can in theory increase performance, but it is not going to be anything very substantial in most cases. Incidentally, on most IDE/ATA systems, the block from C8000 to CBFFFh is reserved by the IDE hard disk BIOS.

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