Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 21 of 21
  1. #16
    Uranium Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Los Angeles Area, California, USA
    Posts
    7,453
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    Well, I just rebooted & went into BIOS setup (pressing F2 on my Micron). I was able to use the PrtScn button to send each page to the printer. The printer didn't print automatically, the way it usually does. I had to press the Start (or Go) button on the printer. And there's no spooling. I had to wait until one page was completely done before I could send the next screen to the printer. Don't know if this will work for you. I'm using an old parallel port HP Laserjet 5P printer.
    Cheers,

  2. #17
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Long Beach, California, USA
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    Thanks for the info. Here is an image of this Windows-based program. Is this what you guys are looking for??
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #18
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Newport Richey, Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,149
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    What the heck is that R2? <img src=/S/dizzy.gif border=0 alt=dizzy width=15 height=15> I took some pictures with my Sony Digital like the one below and it puts them on a floppy for safe keeping. I also backed CMOS up to the program I mentioned above.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    <img src=/S/jollyroger.gif border=0 alt=jollyroger width=29 height=18><IMG SRC=http://www.wopr.com/w3tuserpics/cowboydawg_sig.gif> <img src=/S/jollyroger.gif border=0 alt=jollyroger width=29 height=18>

  4. #19
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Long Beach, California, USA
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    It the raw data from the CMOS chip -- exactly as it is stored, I suspect. Your image shows the 'parsed' data -- so it is easier to read.

    It depends on what you want to do with the information. This program allows you to back-up the CMOS data, and then restore it. Yes, it is the raw data -- but I am not sure that matters, as long as it works!
    ______________________________

    Since CMOS Memory Viewer allows you to archive BIOS settings (and stores date information in the files), you can use CMOS Memory Viewer as a BIOS setting management program (especially usefull when tweaking BIOS settings, and you wan't to restore an old BIOS setup).
    Steps

    1. Load your CMOS onto the 'pasteboard' (click on "Load from CMOS")
    2. Save your CMOS into a file (click on "Save to File")
    3. Later, to restore your old settings, Load your old CMOS onto the pasteboard (click on "Read from File")
    4. Save these restored settings into your BIOS (click on "Write to CMOS")
    5. When you reboot, make sure that you fix up your clock settings (quickly whilst in BIOS or in Windows setup)

    When managing your CMOS saves, you can check the date they were read by clicking on "Read Date Time Stamp" in "Aggregate".

    Accidental Erasure
    CMOS Memory Viewer can also create a disk for restoring an old BIOS setup, in case of a CMOS battery failure.
    (This is extremely useful, all BIOS's should be backed up on either paper (hand written settings) or by floppy disk. This is also useful when tweaking BIOS, but make a disasterous mistake.)
    Steps

    1. Load your current CMOS settings onto the 'pasteboard' (click on "Load from CMOS")
    2. Save your CMOS into a file (click on "Save to File")
    3. Create a disk image of the emergency repair program (click on "Generate Emergency Restore Image"). This will create an image and save it in CMOSViewer's own special file.
    4. Write the image to a disk (click on "Write Emergency Restore Image to Disk") this will create a boot disk which can rewrite your old BIOS settings.

    Remember that when you have created an emergency restore disk, it will not be readable by Windows, but will still be bootable. To test a disk, reboot and choose no when the program asks to rewrite the CMOS. If you do ever need to use the disk, all you need to do is make sure that your floppy drive is the first drive in the boot sequence (most commonly this is the default if CMOS is erased; if not you will need to set up the settings which activate the disk drive, and set it to boot first (this is not that hard, compared with setting up and entire system)).

    Forgotten Passwords
    As an extra, CMOS Memory Viewer can be used to erase a CMOS of which you have forgotten the password.
    Steps

    1. Make sure the 'pasteboard' is 'zeroed' (click on "Clear Cells" in Aggregate)
    2. Save this 'zeroed' CMOS into your BIOS (click on "Write to CMOS")

    Also you could save the 'zeroed pasteboard' to a file and create a disk image so that a floppy disk can erase a CMOS, if another system does not boot to a hard disk, and the password is unknown (I don't endorse its use for malicious purposes - I take absolutely no blame for your actions).
    ______________________________

    Load from CMOS

    Loads the CMOS memory, and displays it on the 'pasteboard'.

    Write to CMOS

    Writes the current 'pasteboard' values into CMOS memory, erasing the current CMOS values.

    Read from File

    Loads the 'pasteboard' with values previously saved.

    Save to File

    Writes the current 'pasteboard' values into the file you select.

    Generate Emergency Restore Image

    Takes a saved CMOS data file, and converts it into an image that will work with "Write Emergency Restore Image to Disk" function.

    Write Emergency Restore Image to Disk

    Takes the image generated by "Generate Emergency Restore Image", and saves it to a floppy disk, for emergencies.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #20
    Silver Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Long Beach, California, USA
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    Oh, I should have quoted. Most of the above is from the Help file that comes with the program. In case some one is interested, I attached the program here.
    _____________

    Nope... too big to attach. Send me an IM or email if you want it...

  6. #21
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    5,016
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Printing BIOS Settings

    Just found this webpage, which might have some <img src=/S/free.gif border=0 alt=free width=30 height=15> utilities to help you out.

    Alan

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •