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  1. #1
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    packaging access db (2002)

    I have an Access front-end with a Sql Server back-end that I'm trying to package for users. I want them to be able to use the front-end without having any access at all to the back-end (i.e. even if they press the shift key while opening,etc.). I tried using the packaging wizard to do this but I'm obviously missing something because the back-end is still accessible from the packaged front-end. A potential monkey-wrench - I want to put the front-end on my server and all of my users will have shortcuts to it on their desktops. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    You can't "package" an application to run from a server. That doesn't make any sense. The runtime installation has to be set up on the machine that the application is being run *from*, which means the individual workstations. A runtime installation hides the database window, but if the application is opened from an installed version of Access, the database window will still be accessible.
    Charlotte

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    OK. Is there any other way I could prevent users from seeing the tables etc. even if they open the application from an installed version of Access?

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    Only by using unbound forms and ADO recordsets to populate them. That requires quite a bit of non-trivial code and it still won't prevent users from looking at the backend, only from looking at it through the database. What is it that you are actually trying to achieve? Access security is probably easier than whatever you're contemplating.
    Charlotte

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    I have an access front-end mdb that links to a Sql Server back-end. I want to prevent the users of the front-end from seeing the objects in the database. However, I don't want them to have to enter a username and password when they open up the front-end. Unfortunately, the users have to have delete permissions because they may have to delete data from fields on a form. However, I do NOT want them to be able to delete records (if I can somehow separate between the two types of deletions). I hope I have clarified my issue. Please let me know if I should clarify further.

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    In that case, assuming you're using ODBC linked tables, you can't really prevent the users from seeing the tables if you give them any means of getting to the database window. What you seem to be asking for is a way to have security without applying any or inconveniencing the users in any way. I don't think that's possible.

    As I mentioned before, using ADO connections instead of ODBC links would prevent there being any tables in the front end for your users to see, regardless. However, the developer then has to create all the handling through code that normally occurs in bound forms. If you're interested in pursuing that course, you can download an Access 2000 sample database called No Tables Sample Database here, under my name. It might give you some ideas. It uses an Access backend but the primary difference in a SQL Server backend is the provider string used in the connection.
    Charlotte

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    Thanks, Charlotte. I think creating all of the links using ADO would be too much work, given the current situation. Thank you, though, for your help!

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    I wouldn't give up on security - you could have all of the users log in with a single userid (though then you can't track who messed up what) by specifying a userid and password in the shortcut - search on "command line" in Help for the details. In addition, with the startup properties, you can hide the database window when the front-end is opened, and if you turn off menus and the SHIFT key capability, you can pretty well keep people out of the tables. That's considerably easier than going to ADO and all the work that entails.

    BTW, putting all of your users into a single front-end isn't a great idea - it can be done but if you have more than a handful it can get pretty flakey. In addition you will find that form load times are considerably longer from a single front-end than when you have the front-end on each workstation.
    Wendell

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    Thanks Wendell! Unfortunately, I found out about the unadvisability of using one front-end the hard way. Back to the ol' drawing board!

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    Disallowing the SHIFT key was exactly what I wanted. (I had already disabled all of the options on the Startup dialog box.) Thanks for the idea! Just a note for other posters - it was not easy to figure out from MS Help how to disallow the bypass (or SHIFT) key. What I finally figured out is: I had to write a function in the VBA code to add the AllowBypassKey property to the database by using the CurrentDB's CreateProperty method. Then I had to set that property to false. Then, I had to run the code (I stepped thru it using F8). When I closed the database and reopened it, the SHIFT key functionality was disabled.

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    You do of course need a back-door so you can get in once you disable the SHIFT key. Some use a hidden button on a form, others may do it via a protected form that only the administrator can run.
    Wendell

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    Re: packaging access db (2002)

    You might find this tutorial on our website of value in going back to the drawing board <img src=/S/thinks.gif border=0 alt=thinks width=15 height=15>
    Wendell

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