Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: ALL CAPS

  1. #1
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    187
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    ALL CAPS

    I'm using our companies intranet to access the file server (AS400 running webgate) for all of our ISO documentation. While copying files from the server down to a local drive (Win98), file names were changed to ALL CAPS. This is a problem with our file naming convention in that all caps designates something and sentence case designate something else. With several hundred files that now need to be renamed under the convention, I'd like to avoid going through this (as in waste of) time consuming chore.

    I checked the settings under tools folder options view all all uppercase names. It was unchecked.

    The strangest thing is that it doesn't change case 100% of the time. Can anyone point me in the right direction.

    Thanx in advance.

  2. #2
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Quedgeley, Gloucester, England
    Posts
    5,333
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Re: ALL CAPS

    About all I can say is since Windows does not treat filenames as case-sensitive (unlike L*n*x), it doesn't put too much effort into keeping them in the case in which you originally created them. Could any particular updating program be implicated? (My DOS editor "E" always writes upper-case filenames, for example...!)
    <font face="Script MT Bold"><font color=blue><big><big>John</big></big></font color=blue></font face=script>

    Ita, esto, quidcumque...

  3. #3
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    187
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: ALL CAPS

    I'm unaware of any "updating program" that could be the culprit. I was simply dropping & dragging the contents of a webgate (intranet) folder to a local folder. I've seen this behavior on other machines. Could it be something in the setup of networking connection?

  4. #4
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Quedgeley, Gloucester, England
    Posts
    5,333
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Re: ALL CAPS

    I can't think of anything in "networking" that would inconsistently change the case of filenames -- it's a bit far away from that, and anyway, this feature should be controlled by the File System...

    I don't think I can be much help here, other than sympathising... <img src=/S/sad.gif border=0 alt=sad width=15 height=15>
    <font face="Script MT Bold"><font color=blue><big><big>John</big></big></font color=blue></font face=script>

    Ita, esto, quidcumque...

  5. #5
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Vienna, Wien, Austria
    Posts
    5,009
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: ALL CAPS

    Don't know whether it's relevant, but Windows 9x tends to change something that is all lower case into all upper case, but leaves something in mixed case alone. YMVM (Your mileage may vary.)
    Gre

  6. #6
    2 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    187
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: ALL CAPS

    Here are examples of the file naming convention that we are using:
    RQS 7000 PROCEDURE - Systems - Doc Requirements & Planning of Product Realization
    RQS 7001 PROCEDURE - Systems - Document Control
    RQS 7002 PROCEDURE - Systems - Internal Quality Audit
    RQS 7002.1 FORM - Systems - Internal Quality Audit
    RQS 7003 PROCEDURE - Systems - Quality Records
    RQS 7003.1 TABLE - Quality Records, Retention & Storage
    RQS 7004 PROCEDURE - Systems - Corrective, Preventive Action

    When copied into a Win98 local drive, they convert to all caps.

    The following was e-mailed to me from our IS Department. Although interesting, I must admit I don't really understand what this is telling me. Can anyone interpret this?

    Windows 95 and Windows 98 Filenames on FAT-Formatted Drives
    FAT (File Allocation Table) was the original file system used for storage disks (e.g., hard drives, floppy disks) on IBM-compatible computers. It is the only file system available in DOS 7.0 and earlier, Windows 3.x, Windows 95, and Windows 98, and is compatible with Windows NT.
    When accessed from Windows 95 or Windows 98, a FAT-formatted disk requires
    - file and folder names to have 255 characters or fewer.
    - the path to the file (e.g., C:WinNTfile.txt) to have 260 or fewer characters.
    - you to name files and folders using only DOS-compliant and the following characters:

    Plus sign +
    Comma ,
    Semicolon ;
    Equal sign =
    Brackets [ ]
    FAT-formatted drives also let you use space characters in file and folder names.
    Note: OEM character sets (e.g., the Microsoft Excel extended character set) can also be used by applications to make special characters in long filenames. However, other applications may not support these filenames.
    Windows 95 and Windows 98 maintain two distinct filenames for each file: the filename that you enter in Windows, known as the filename alias, and the filename that is stored on disk, which is DOS-compliant.
    If a filename you type is DOS-compliant, Windows 95 and Windows 98 save the filename alias as the DOS-compliant filename, but display the filename as lowercase with an initial cap.
    If a filename you enter in is not DOS-compliant, Windows 95 and Windows 98 create a DOS-compliant filename it uses to store the file on disk that is based on the filename alias. Because Windows may display characters in a filename with a different case than the file's DOS-compliant filename or alias, it is impossible to know whether the file has a DOS-compliant filename by looking at its name in Windows. The examples in the following table should help make these rules clear:


    Filename as Typed----Filename Alias----Filename Displayed by Windows 95----Filename Stored on Disk
    TESTME.DOC----TESTME.DOC----Testme.doc----TESTME.DOC
    Testme.doc----Testme.doc----Testme.doc----TESTME.DOC
    TeSTME.DOC----TeSTME.DOC----TeSTME.DOC----TESTME.DOC
    testme.doc----testme.doc----testme.doc----TESTME.DOC
    TEST_ME.DOC----TEST_ME.DOC----Test_me.doc----TEST_ME.DOC
    TEST ME.DOC----TEST ME.DOC----TEST ME.DOC----TESTM~1.DOC
    LONGTESTME.DOC----LONGTESTME.DOC----LONGTESTME.DOC----LONGTE~1.DOC
    LongTestMeMore.doc----LongTestMeMore.doc----LongTestMeMore.doc----LONGTE~2.DOC
    testme.bigextension----testme.bigextension----testme.bigextension----TESTME.BIG


    If a filename alias is altered but not completely retyped, Windows rewrites the assigned alias to match the displayed one. To use the first example from the table above, If you rename the displayed alias from "Testme.doc" to "Testme1.doc" simply by inserting a "1" in the displayed alias, Windows changes the assigned alias from "TESTME.DOC" to "Testme1.doc." The DOS name remains unchanged.
    You can view a file's or folder's DOS-compliant name in Windows by right-clicking it and choosing Properties from the pop-up menu. In the Properties dialog displays it as the MS-DOS name. You can also type the dir command at the MS-DOS Prompt to see a file's or folder's DOS-compliant name.
    Windows not only uses the filename alias for display, but may also use it as a reference when a file is moved, copied, stored, or linked to by an application, server, or other system. Whether Windows uses the alias or the DOS-compliant filename depends on the situation.

  7. #7
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Quedgeley, Gloucester, England
    Posts
    5,333
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Re: ALL CAPS

    My summary would be:

    "Do not use a naming convention which relies upon the case of filenames, for unhappiness will undoubtedly occur"...
    <font face="Script MT Bold"><font color=blue><big><big>John</big></big></font color=blue></font face=script>

    Ita, esto, quidcumque...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •