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  1. #1
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    Moving Windows From D Drive to C Drive (XP Pro SR-1)

    Hi,

    I've a dual boot PC with Windows 2000 (and all the boot files) on the C Drive, and Windows XP Pro on the D Drive. I also have Norton Ghost backup images of both drives (the OS's and major applications).

    Now I'm going to get another computer and keep the old one to play around with home networking and such. The old one will stay my Windows 2000 machine, and I'd like to use the new one as my XP machine. I can restore the image file to the new PC, but of course in the new machine it would be on the C drive. Is there a way to do that, or do I have to have XP on a "D Drive" partition on the new machine - short of reinstalling everything fresh on the new computer?

    Thanks for any help!

    John DeA

  2. #2
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    Re: Moving Windows From D Drive to C Drive (XP Pro SR-1)

    How are going to restore your image without a OS?

    You are going to have to "Install Windows XP" on the new machine and activate it. The new machine would have to the the EXACT SAME hardware in order to use the "image". You are going to have to install ALL of your programs also.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  3. #3
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    Re: Moving Windows From D Drive to C Drive (XP Pro SR-1)

    Hi Dave,

    As for restoring the image, I've done that in the past (albeit on the same machine) by using my Norton Boot Disk - I've had no problem restoring an image after I've reformatted my hard drives.

    As for the hardware; would it have to be exactly the same? When I was originally installing Windows XP and my everyday applications (Office, Visual Studio), I purposely created an image before I set up all the drivers for sound card, network card, and all my peripherals - sort of a "hardware independent" image. Just used the most basic generic monitor settings. Could that not work in this case? Isn't that what's done when someone brings in their old PC to have everything moved over to a new system? I know I'd have to re-activate afterwards for the new hardware setup.

    Thanks,

    John

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    Re: Moving Windows From D Drive to C Drive (XP Pro SR-1)

    As for the hardware NOT being the same you are going be doing a LOT of new hardware found. You will find that the registry from the old machine will not work very well on the new machine.


    2)Isn't that what's done when someone brings in their old PC to have everything moved over to a new system?
    No, most of the time the new OS is on the new machine and then a copy of the "c" drive is placed in a folder and one must move the "Data" to the location user wants it to be at. The unused files are then deleted. This is the ONLY way a shop can be sure that all was copied. If you have more than one drive and/or partition in the old machine, then these to would need to be copied.

    I know no repair shop or OEM that will install your software without your legal CDs and/or floppies.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

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    Re: Moving Windows From D Drive to C Drive (XP Pro SR-1)

    ExtremeTech has a well-written explanation on activation, which may give you some ideas about what to expect. Although I've never attempted what you are planning to try, I would think that Windows XP would start up and recognize changes in hardware, and then require a re-activation call to the Redmond behemoth. Reactivation occurs after three hardware devices have changed within a specified period of time, and is also "weighted" based on the hardware type itself. Adding memory, for example, isn't going to set the WPA beast on alert, but swapping a motherboard or NIC might. So the answer to your question about hardware is....'it depends.'

    You can always try it out. If it doesn't work right, then you can perform a fresh installation. The latter option might be the best bet anyway, just to have that "nice fresh" feeling to your OS.
    -Mark

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