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  1. #1
    Danah.Easton
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    W2K & User Rights

    My office is beginning the transition from Windows NT4.0 to W2K Professional (w/Office 2000). I am running into a lot of problems with user rights - it seems that some of the programs don't work properly unless the user has admin. or power user privileges. I have tried making the user administrator of their machine when I install the software and then remove their rights once installed - as soon as they log in without those rights the applications no longer work. Keep getting an error saying the computer cannot find the registry settings or that the program is not a recognized program.....HELP!?!?!?!?!?

  2. #2
    Bronze Lounger
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    Re: W2K & User Rights

    During the installation you can set up an identity for your user, and for an administrator (and even for a guest). Since these will be made to require different passwords, you should set up using admin privileges, and then simply don't disclose the admin password. The user will then log on as him or her self, using the password for that identity. It need not include admin privileges, but certain Win2k functions will not be available to them (on purpose). You should always retain the admin settings, because if something goes wrong (and it will) you yourself will need to get into the workstation. Also, as you have found, essential parts are disabled if you try to cancel the admin.
    Identities can be managed from the Control panel applet once the system is up and running.

    Rgds

  3. #3
    Danah.Easton
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    Re: W2K & User Rights

    Typically there are 2 users for the machine - an administrator with full privileges, and a local user with very limited privileges (each with different passwords). I keep an administrator account on the machine and use that when installing software or making system changes. The problem I am running into though - after installing the software as an administrator, when the local user logs in they are not able to access the software (or it doesn't run properly - registry errors, etc.). I have tried giving the local user administrative privileges just when installing the software and everything works fine - they are able to utilize the software. As soon as their administrative privilieges are removed (but leaving the administrator user in tact) I have the same problems again.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: W2K & User Rights

    Is this consistent with your problems?

    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q242/5/91.ASP>PRB: Running Noncertified Applications as a Non-Administrator</A>

    <hr>In general, applications written to the Microsoft Windows 9x and Microsoft Windows NT family paradigm function correctly on Windows 2000 given appropriate access control. Power Users have at least the same access that Windows NT 4.0 Users have. Any application that runs as a User on Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 should run as a "Power Users" on Windows 2000.<hr>
    In other words, it's a feature, not a bug. <img src=/S/tongue.gif border=0 alt=tongue width=15 height=15>

  5. #5
    New Lounger
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    Re: W2K & User Rights

    We had this problem with several applications. I found that some of the necessary registry settings weren't being allowed to be copied from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWARE key to the non-Admin HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWARE key.

    Whilst logged on as the under-priviliged user,
    <UL><LI>Run Regedit.
    <LI>Navigate to (and click on) HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMyNewSoftware.
    <LI>Click on the Registry menu, and Export registry.
    <LI>Save file to desktop (with a name like MyNewSoftware.reg).
    <LI>Using your favorite text editor, change the words LOCAL_MACHINE to read CURRENT_USER in the MyNewSoftware.reg file.
    <LI>Save the file.
    <LI>Close your editor.
    <LI>Double-click on the MyNewSoftware.reg file to re-import it back into the registry.
    <LI>Run MyNewSoftware and celebrate![/list]This may have only worked for the applications that we were using, and the advice may not apply to your situation, but it might be worth trying, especially if the information was successfully copied to the Admin HKEY_CURRENT_USERSOFTWAREMyNewSoftware key during software installation. In our case, the keys contained information about the locations of databases and software licenses. Without that info, Admin users could run the software, but lowly Users got a "Could Not Find Database", or "User is not licensed to run software" errors.

    <big><font color=red>As with all registry edits, BE CAREFUL.</font color=red></big>

  6. #6
    New Lounger
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    Re: W2K & User Rights

    This is really a great solution to an all too typical problem. Good solution! <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15>

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