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  1. #1
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    Converting 97 to 2000

    I am in the process of converting 97 databases to 2000. When it is converted and I start to run it I error out at Error$. Does this need to be changed to something else? What does it have to do with. I have looked through the help and some areas they are really great but with this whole conversion issue they are pretty vague.
    Thanks for the Help,
    Kristen

  2. #2
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    Re: Converting 97 to 2000

    If you go into Tools, References, do any show up as MISSING in the list?

    You may need to point the offending references at different files now.

    Jeremy

  3. #3
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    Re: Converting 97 to 2000

    After I point them to something else. Is there any reason to change the Error$ to something like Err.Description?
    Kristen

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    Re: Converting 97 to 2000

    Kristen, I have always used Err.description and err.number for error trapping in Access 97 (and now 2000) - I think they're now the standard way to report errors.

    I can't remember how Error$ functions - so long since I last used it!

    Jeremy

  5. #5
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    Re: Converting 97 to 2000

    Error$ is obsolete, so it's only going to work if you have a compatibility library checked, which should be a last resort to run obsolete code where you aren't going to modify the database at all in the future. Instead, change them all to err.Description, which will give you the error string, and use err or err.number to return the error number. I believe 97 was the first version that fully exposed the err objects (it could have been 95, but who remembers). If you're using ADO in Access 2000, you also have an errors collection of the connection object, which is NOT quite the same thing as the Access errors collection.
    Charlotte

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