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  1. #1
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: Reengaging Dual Hard Drive Settings

    To restore the dual-boot situation, you need to re-run Windows 2000 setup and allow it to repair the boot sector. This is documented in article 283359 and article 293089 in the Knowledge Base.

    You will need to obtain a startup floppy that enables CD-ROM access if your computer does not support booting directly from the Windows 2000 CD.
    -Mark

  2. #2
    New Lounger
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    Reengaging Dual Hard Drive Settings

    I have a dual internal hard drives with Win-98 on the C drive and Win-2000 on the D drive. I boot to the D drive (the default) almost all the time. The Dell has worked faithfully for two years. There are no partitions.

    Today, stupid me, I made a boo boo by trying to boot from the Win-98 restore disk (floppy) and it erased the settings for dual boot.

    Now I can only boot to the C drive in safe mode with no CD capability. Can't get to the D drive.

    I do not know how to set up the dual hard drive boot. Do I do it from the BIOS? Only one hard drive shows on the BIOS setup.

    I hope someone can walk me thru the steps to reinstate the dual boot options. Please bear in mind, it has worked properly for two three years.

  3. #3
    New Lounger
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    Re: Reengaging Dual Hard Drive Settings

    Mark....thanks. You made it sound easy. I will tackle this first thing in the AM with a fresh head.

    I have the emergency repair disk (and four setup floppies) for W-2k. I guess I should use them since the CD drive is not available?

    I read the two KB articles also.

    293089 said:
    To restore the boot sector:
    Start Windows 2000 by using the Windows 2000 CD-ROM or Setup boot disks.
    When Windows 2000 Setup starts, press ENTER to start, and then press the R key to repair the existing installation.
    Press R again to initiate the emergency repair process to fix the existing installation of Windows 2000.
    Press F to initiate the process that automatically repairs the computer.
    If you have an ERD, insert the disk when you are prompted, and then when Setup completes repairing your boot sector, restart your computer to finish the process.

    If you do not have an ERD, press L. Windows starts to search for the installation and displays any installation that it finds. If the emergency repair process cannot locate the Windows 2000 installation, reinstall Windows 2000.

    How does it know to install (repair) to the D drive and not the C?

  4. #4
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: Reengaging Dual Hard Drive Settings

    I hope that you find it as easy as it sounds. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>

    The setup program will know where the installation of Windows 2000 is by virtue of your ERD's contents, and also by scanning your fixed disk for it. Believe it or not, though, even though you have Windows 2000 installed on the D: drive, there are still critical files to its operation living on the C: drive. This is because C: is your boot drive, and it contains all of the information that the computer needs to start Windows.

    Windows 2000 (as with NT and XP) creates a dual-boot setup by copying the existing boot sector to a file (BOOTSECT.DAT) and then putting its own boot loader in its place when you install the operating system. It's a really interesting "hack" that Microsoft came up with years ago, but the reason it's on C: is because of the way Intel-based computers work - that is, they expect to find a boot sector on the first partition of the first hard drive in the system, and that is almost always the C: drive.
    -Mark

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