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  1. #1
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    COM References (VB .NET 2003)

    Anybody else see the following?
    ----------------
    On my J drive, I have a Win 2000 system that has Office 2003 installed, and has never had an earlier version of Office installed. I find that the list of available COM references in VS .NET 2003 includes references for both the Office 10 object library and the Office 11 object library.

    The reference for Office 10 is to G:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10, which is in an OS on the G drive in this multiboot system.

    However, I also note that the system on the J drive has both J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10 and J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice11, each of which has a different mso.dll.

    Looking at the Registry, I see typelib entries for

    Microsoft Office 10.0 Object Library in G:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10mso.dll
    Microsoft Office 11.0 Object Library in J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice11mso.dll

    My questions include:

    1. How did a reference to a never installed version of an Office object library get included in the registry?
    2. What is the purpose of the, apparently, spurious J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10?

  2. #2
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    Re: COM References (VB .NET 2003)

    My best guess is that the Office 10 MSO.DLL file was installed to your non-Office 10 partition via a service update run on your Office 10 partition. It's entirely possible that part of the update process scans your system for any Office installation folder and makes the necessary updates there.

    Another idea is that the MSO.DLL could be part of another package that's been installed (such as the Access Runtime).

    My questions would be this:
    1) Are you having any problems from the existence of a second dll?
    2) If not, why worry about it? <img src=/S/shrug.gif border=0 alt=shrug width=39 height=15>

  3. #3
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    Re: COM References (VB .NET 2003)

    1. The WinNT directory on drive J is dated 8/20/2003 10:00, so I guess that is when I did the clean install of Win 2000 on J.

    2. J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice11 is dated 10/24/2003 14:31, which is when I installed Office 2003.

    3. J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10 is dated 8/21/2003 19:14..

    4. I installed VS .NET 2003 on K to save space on the J drive. K:Program FilesMicrosoft Visual Studio .NET 2003 is dated 8/21/2003 19:09, so I expect that J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10 was created during the install of VS .NET 2003. This solves part of the mystery.

    However, it does not explain why the COM object reference points to G:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10 instead of J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10.

    There is the implication that something searched ALL the drives and determined that G:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10 was more up to date than J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10. I sure hope not, but that's what it looks like.

    I'm wondering what will happen if there is ever an update to VS .NET 2003 that needs to update the files in J:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10. Will it instead/also update the files in G:Program FilesCommon FilesMicrosoft SharedOffice10? I sure hope not as that might break the Office XP installation in the OS on G.

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