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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Music Splitting Software

    Hi,

    Don't know if this is possible but will ask anyway.

    Is there any software available that enables you to remove the singing from a music track/mp3, so only the music is left.

    Any suggstions would be appreciated
    Dax


  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    I'll be interested too whether anyone here knows of anything. I suspect it may be a risk of copyright infringement so software to do it may not be around. In the not too distant past, I had visions of participating in an amateur "show" at the nursing home where I volunteer. I have some fave songs that I wanted to cut or diminish the vocals on, so I went Googling. I was able to get a number of hits from outfits willing to do such a thing, essentially creating a "karaoke" file, for a FEE. The fees were not at all visible and there were disclaimers about quality that persuaded me to abandon the project.

  3. #3
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    I know of software that can cut, fade in and out, etc, but none that can remove the singing and leave the soundtrack only. Would seem to me that this is not possible digitally because the nature of the recording. If there were two streams that could be separated then maybe, but I think there is only one stream. You might find something to cut out certain highs and lows, but this would cut highs and lows of the music as well.

    If this were possible it would be great, I have two young daughters who love to dance to some of the current music, but I won't let them listen after a certain point because of the lyrics. Shame isn't it!

  4. #4
    3 Star Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    Thanks Michael and Bigaldoc for your replies.

    It appears there is no such piece of software unless you own a recording studio.

    FYI I did find out something interesting from a friends music teacher. She advised there are karaoke machines around that can remove the singing and then by connecting a tape recorder, record just the music. She knows someone that has such a machine and we are going to give it a try next week. Will let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again
    Cheers
    Dax


  5. #5
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    I would be very interested in what brand of machine it is, as both my girls can be heard just before bedtime singing in the bathroom (while they are supposed to be brushing their teeth!)

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    Aha, thanks for posting that, Dax! At the aforementioned nursing home, I did notice that one or two of the staff who participated in the talent show for the residents, had music playing in the background but I couldn't see whether it was tape or karaoke. Please DO post back what you learn.

  7. #7
    3 Star Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    Have not tried this program but it may do what you want. Yogen

  8. #8
    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    I think you will find that anything that performs a vocal cut will leave you with something less than desirable. I use CoolEdit Pro at home for recording, and it has a vocal cut filter. Karaoke machines do the same thing with hardware. In order to obtain a piece of music without vocals that is better than marginal quality, it needs to be mixed as such from the original master, as Michael noted in his previous reply.

    Removing a vocal in this manner is accomplished by reducing amplitude (volume) of a frequency range, typically around 1KHz, based on the position of a sound in the stereo field. Vocals are typically mixed equally loud into both left and right stereo channels. The human voice spans a narrow frequency range, so the cut process reduces the amplitude of that frequency range when it is identical in both left and right channels. In the process it also removes any other sounds that are centered in the mix and fall into that frequency range - particularly guitars, brass instruments and most midrange tones.

    All methods leave you with a track that is watery sounding and is missing a good deal of the original music. I have used CoolEdit's filter to practice vocal leads for songs that I intend to cover with my band, but it is not something that I would present for public consumption. In fact, I would not even listen to it for personal pleasure either!
    -Mark

  9. #9
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    Amen, Mark. Just so Dax knows that there's more than one of us who's tried it, I have Cool Edit 2000 (not the Pro version) and it too has a vocal cut filter which I had tried on a couple of songs for that entertainment episode I described. It was so bad that I never even saved the resulting file. One of my attempts was on Stevie Wonder's "I Just Called To Say I Love You," and Stevie was ever-present in the resulting track, sounding like he was in the shower, echoing all over the place. His organ was still WAY in the background and it sounded too squeaky to describe. I couldn't stand playing it here on the PC, let alone in front of a bunch of my "peers."

  10. #10
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    Thanks for this link. I grabbed a few of the featured apps.
    <img src=/w3timages/blue3line.gif width=33% height=2>
    <img src=/S/flags/Argentina.gif border=0 alt=Argentina width=30 height=18> <big><font color=4682b4><font face="Comic Sans MS">Diegol</font face=comic></font color=4682b4> </big>

  11. #11
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    Re: Music Splitting Software

    You may want to also check out audacity. I tried it and was able to almost completely remove the vocals from a track. I could faintly still hear it, but it was a level that was acceptable for my use.

    It says it may not work on all tracks, depending on how it was encoded.

  12. #12
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    My Voice AKA No Voice

    I should have read this thread first, but since this software was "$9.99 after rebate" I tried it out. Here's a "review":

    If you like karaoke but prefer the unique qualities of the original recordings, the recently released program My Voice will tempt you. Developed by IPE Music (http://www.ipemusic.com/) in France, and distributed in the U.S. and Canada by eMedia Music (http://www.emediamusic.com/), the $30 software (microphone included in the box) can suppress the lead vocals on tracks from audio CDs or saved MP3s. It also will record your voice track and let you mix a final version with echo, reverb, and other effects. Sounds awesome, but there is a catch: the software often mistakes certain musical sounds for vocals, in some cases suppressing some of the most prized elements of the recording.

    I tried out version 1.4.5 with a couple of audio CDs and several MP3s from my iTunes library. The program's interface is very rich in controls, and it seems especially busy because there is a large information pane that changes as you mouse over different parts of the window. This is handy because you don't need to right-click or press F1 for help, but as you move the mouse around it can be quite distracting. (It would be nice if there were a short delay so that the info pane didn't update until you had hovered the mouse over a particular control for a few hundred milliseconds.) After inserting a CD, the program either will find the names of the tracks in its local database or can look them up on the web. The player controls are fairly straightforward and you can use the mouse-over help combined with experimentation to decide which "special effects" you like.

    To suppress the vocals on the current track, click the "MyVoice" button (arm holding microphone). You're likely to hear the volume decrease a bit as similar frequencies also are suppressed. You also may hear a little echo or "ghost voice" in the background, probably added in the studio to enhance the richness of the singer's voice. To adjust the effect, you click the MyVoice button to pop up a small panel that lets you boost or reduce the bass portion of the track, and make other adjustments that partially compensate for change in the higher registers. This part of the program could be better documented, but from my experiments, while it can help to rebalance the musical portions of the recording, it can't restore lost instruments. The problem was especially acute on the Santana hit Smooth, where many of the distinctive guitar solos disappeared along with Rob Thomas' vocals. Even percussion sounds, which a human could distinguish from a voice, occasionally was suppressed and impossible to restore. Because performance varies, you really just have to try it and see whether the effect "works" for your favorite songs.

    (The Ripper lets you apply these adjustments to the tracks on a CD, saving the "no voice" tracks for future play. I didn't test this.)

    When you are ready to sing, you call up the Sequencer. This pane/dialog leads to the options to record your own vocals and then mix them with the original track. The settings you made for the musical track in the player will carry over to the Sequencer, and you can make further adjustments as you desire. When recording your voice, it is best to have the Music Effects controls visible because then the program gives you visual feedback on the volume of your microphone and stops recording when the song is finished (otherwise, you have to stop it manually). When you play back your recording, you may be distressed to find that it is out of sequence with the original track. There is no way to adjust that at this point, so you should try to focus on the relative volume of the two tracks and whether you want to add any reverb, echo or other effects to your voice. (Screen shot (151Kb)) When you are ready to mix them together, you click "Creates the mix music+vocals." After the software imports the two tracks, you can "pre-listen" to the mix and adjust the synchronization. I found that the program had sync gaps of anywhere from 75 to 200 milliseconds for MP3s, but was perfect for audio CD tracks. If the relative volume needs further adjustment, you need to cancel out of this dialog and return to the sequencer (this is a little frustrating since it seems as though it should be such a simple adjustment). When your mix is perfect, you can save it as a WAV file and, optionally, burn it to audio CD.

    All in all, it's a fun toy with a number of frustrations. Other developers could learn from the software's unique behavior when you click on a control that is not available because you have a particular dialog/pane open: it move the pointer to the dialog's close button and highlights it so you know what you need to do to navigate to that control. On the other hand, this can happen when you click in the wrong part of a control that actually is currently available. (For example, when the Sequencer is open, you can drag the sliders on the Equalizer, but if you double-click a slider to enter a numeric value, the pointer moves to the Close button even though this is a perfectly appropriate function in that context.) Some quibbles arise from lack of compliance with Windows conventions. For example, the navigator to browse for MP3s has a tree view in the left pane, but cannot show subfolders in the right pane, just files. That should be easy to fix. However, the main problem is that the software simply falls short of the very ambitious project of removing just the vocals. In this, the developers may be ahead of the market, but they still have a lot of work to do.

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