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  1. #1
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    Flat Sign (2000 (9.0.3821 SR-1))

    <img src=/S/help.gif border=0 alt=help width=23 height=15> Can anyone please tell me how to make a flat sign show up in a database of music I am creating. I have succeeded in making a flat sign show up in the validation rule, but when I copy the same character into the datasheet view, it shows up as the rectangle that denotes an unsupported character.

    Thank you for any help.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Flat Sign (2000 (9.0.3821 SR-1))

    The character denoting "flat" in music is only present in a few fonts, such as Arial Unicode MS and MS Mincho. It is the Unicode character with hex code 266D. Access 97 didn't suppirt Unicode at all, Access 2000 does, but I'm not sure to what extent. In Access 2002 (which is what I'm using), the "flat" character displays correctly.

    If you insert this character in a Word document, using Insert | Symbol, then copy it into Access, and select one of the fonts mentioned above, does it show up correctly then?

  3. #3
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    Re: Flat Sign (2000 (9.0.3821 SR-1))

    <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15> Thank you very much. With much searching, I found downloads of the fonts you name (at http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/library/Fonts/), and they solve the problem. I also tried the largest font file I already had, Dotum & Dotum Che, and they show flat correctly too.

    Strangely, the character shows up okay without the above changes in MS Excel, MS Internet Explorer (sometimes), and MS Access in the Validation Rule, so they must be using some sort of intelligent font substitution. The character does not show in Word in any of the Arial fonts I had before, but in the Arial Unicode, Dotum, etc., it shows up fine.

    In summary, you have solved not only the problem I originally described, but many others I would have had later without your help. Thank you very much. (Thank you too to Woody, for the forum that brought your help.)

    Incidentally, I can't understand why the ASCII character set includes sharp but not flat. <img src=/S/wink.gif border=0 alt=wink width=15 height=15>

  4. #4
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    Re: Flat Sign (2000 (9.0.3821 SR-1))

    The ANSI/ASCII character set includes the "hash" character #. This resembles the character for "sharp" but it is not quite the same. The Unicode character set contains a genuine "sharp" character.
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  5. #5
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    Re: Flat Sign (2000 (9.0.3821 SR-1))

    I see the difference. Since I am going to the trouble of using flat signs, I will also use sharp signs per your information.

    For the possible help of others with similar problems, who don't want to download a font file of several megabytes, I have listed all the fonts in my computer that contain flat, natural, and (the real) sharp. I don't know how they got there, but some may already be on many readers' machines.

    Arial Unicode
    Dotum (lacks natural and sharp)
    DotumChe (lacks natural and sharp)
    Gulim (lacks natural and sharp)
    GulimChe (lacks natural and sharp)
    Lucida Sans Unicode
    Microsoft Sans Serif
    MS Gothic
    MS Mincho (has serifs)
    MS PGothic
    MS PMincho (has serifs)
    MS UI Gothic
    Tahoma

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