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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    User Problems (2000)

    I've got a database which is on a network, and is running smoothly. The problem is when I want to do any administrative work on the database, when I ask the users to log out, it doesn't log one of them out properly, and I can't do any maintenance until they reboot their machine, which isn't always pheasable. Is there a way I can get round this problem, so I can perform maintenance?

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    Does this happen with one specific user, or on one specific PC? You can test if it happens if the same user logs in on another PC, and/or if another user logs in on the problem PC
    What happens exactly? For example, does Access remain in memory on the problem PC? You can check this in the Processes tab of Task Manager; look for MsAccess.exe. I assume that the .ldb file doesn't get deleted; can you delete it manually?

  3. #3
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    It's actually not the user but the PC. Whoever has been logged on, it still does the same. I use another PC to get to the database, and I get the message that any changes I make will not be changed, as the database is in use, even after everyone has logged off.

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    How about the second part of my reply?
    <hr>What happens exactly? For example, does Access remain in memory on the problem PC? You can check this in the Processes tab of Task Manager; look for MsAccess.exe. I assume that the .ldb file doesn't get deleted; can you delete it manually?<hr>

  5. #5
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    I don't know about the taskmanager bit, do you mean on the pc with the problem? The .ldb file does remain on, but I am able to delete it.

  6. #6
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    In Windows NT / 2000 / XP, you can right-click the Windows task bar and select Task Manager from the popup menu. Windows 95 / 98 / ME have something similar, but I have forgotten the exact name - System Monitor or something like that; it is in Start | Programs | Accessories | System Tools.

    It displays a window with several tabs: Applications shows the status of active programs and Processes shows all active processes, with their CPU and memory usage. Sometimes when you quit a program, it disappears from the Applications tab, but it remains in memory; if so, it will still be listed in the Processes tab.

    You would have to test this on the PC that has the problem, not on your own PC, since you don't have the problem there.

    By the way, if you delete the .ldb file manually, can you edit the database then?

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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    I'll have to do the test later when they're not so busy. In answer to your other question, no I still can't edit the database when I manually delete the .ldb file.

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: User Problems (2000)

    There isn't any way to get around it if you can't get an exclusive lock on the database, feasible or not. Even if you could make design changes when someone else had not logged out properly, the changes would be lost when that user *did* log out because the copy in memory on their machine would overwrite any changes you had made. I had this experience with Access 97, so I approve of the change in 2000 and later, even though it sometimes makes more work.

    It is possible to use ADO to determine what machines are maintaining a connection to a data file by using the OpenSchema method to return the Jet User Roster. That might at least help you figure out which machines are causing the problem. Take a look at HOW TO: Check Who Logged into Database with Jet UserRoster in Access 2000 for more information on that.
    Charlotte

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