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  1. #1
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    Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    My parents' vegetable garden is going great guns again this year, so I have a pile of tomatoes, and more to come.

    I would like to maybe make spaghetti sauce or pizza sauce, but I can't seem to get a recipe that uses whole tomatoes, not just a can of stewed, or a can of tomato sauce. And frankly, it;s more of a curiousity thing than anything else.

    Any good tomato sauce recipes out there?

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    Fresh tomatoes and canned whole or cut tomatoes probably are very similar. The water content of fresh tomatoes might be a bit higher, so it makes sense to add more of them. You might want to blanch off the skin in advance (cookbooks should describe the process). If you want the tomatoes to fall apart, you could cook them separately for a while and then put them through a food mill. If you don't have a food mill (who does anymore?) you could try a food processor, set on "chunky." <img src=/S/grin.gif border=0 alt=grin width=15 height=15> Careful not to burn yourself!

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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    Thanks!

    I just need to think about how many tomotoes are in a "can."

    Whether to include the skin and seeds was one of my particular questions.

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    If I recall correctly, the typical can weighs 28 ounces and contains a lot of "juice" in that weight. If you use two pounds (32 oz) of fresh tomatoes, that's probably close enough to be considered 1 can. It might need a touch more salt or sugar than the canned product, but if it is too watery a little extra cooking time will take care of that. (And, of course, help the flavors to blend.)

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    A colleague of mine from Pennsylvania asked her mother for a recipe. We Californians are not able to judge the correctness of these gargantuan proportions, so check it out with a trusted neighbor.

    Spaghetti Sauce

    1/2 bushel tomatoes
    2 garlic bulbs
    4 hot peppers or 1 hot pepper and three green peppers
    3 lbs onions
    1 pt oil
    8 small cans tomato paste
    1/2 cup sugar
    1/2 cup salt
    1 tsp fresh basil
    1 tblsp oregano

    Cook tomatoes- garlic-onions together, then strain

    Cut peppers and onions, cook in 1 pt oil, for 30 min or until soft.
    Put through strainer and add this to above juice. Then add 8 small cans of
    paste, sugar, salt, basil, oregano.
    bake in 325 temp oven for five hrs or thick, put into jars-hot and seal.
    Makes about nine qt.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Catsup (Sweet and spicy- great with venison burgers)

    Cook 8 quarts red ripe tomatoes until soft.
    Put in (cheesecloth) bag and drain over night.

    Put pulp through sieve to remove seeds then add the following:
    3 cups sugar
    1 pt vinegar
    3 teas salt
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon allspice
    1/4 teaspoon mustard powder
    1/4 teaspoon cloves

    Boil 10 min or thick; put into jars and seal. Yields 3 pt.

  6. #6
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    I found this recipe here

    Homemade Tomato Sauce Recipe
    Ingredients
    1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, peeled, coarsely chopped (2 cups)
    1 large carrot or 2 small carrots, peeled, coarsely chopped (about 3/4 cup)
    3 garlic cloves, peeled, finely chopped
    <font color=red>5 large tomatoes, coarsely chopped (4 cups)</font color=red> or 2 (28-ounce) cans whole tomatoes, drained, coarsely chopped
    2 tablespoons tomato paste
    Coarse sea salt to taste
    Freshly ground black pepper to taste


    Instructions
    In a large heavy skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Saute the onion and carrot for 2 to 3 minutes, reduce the heat to medium, cover and sweat the vegetables over medium heat for about 25 minutes or until soft and golden.

    Add the garlic, stir well, cover and sweat for 5 minutes more or until softened. Add the tomatoes and tomato paste. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes to blend the flavors.

    Push the cooked sauce through a food mill or blend in a food processor and push through a sturdy, small-holed strainer into a large bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste.

    The sauce can be cooled and stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or frozen up to 3 months.

    Yield: 8 servings

    or this one here

    Homemade Tomato Sauce
    PREP TIME: 2 Hours

    COMMENT: Use fresh, vine-ripened tomatoes from your garden to make this wonderful tomato sauce. It can be eaten over pasta, added to your favorite recipe in place of canned tomato sauce or given as a gift.

    INGREDIENTS AND SUPPLIES:

    Tomatoes

    Large saucepot

    Manual or electric food mill

    Food thermometer

    Garlic

    Basil or Oregano

    Home canning jars

    METHOD:
    Wash fresh, ripe, whole tomatoes thoroughly and cut in half to expose any brown spots or insects. Place in manageable batches into a large saucepot with
    <IMG SRC=http://www.wopr.com/w3tuserpics/DocWatson_sig.gif>

  7. #7
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    Hi jhelfer,

    Doc Watson and Jefferson have some delicious sounding recipes, but this statement in one of the recipes concerned me....."Place sterilized cap and lid on jar, closing tightly. Turn jar upside down to cool."

    I would be very cautious about using this method. Mom and I used to cook the tomato juice, put it into hot jars and cap it snuggly and set it in an area away from drafts. When the lids "popped", we knew they were sealed and we never had much trouble keeping our juice in this manner. But with the variety of tomatoes that we grow today, the acidity is questionable so this method of canning is not recommended any more.

    Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Service offers this information regarding the process of preserving tomatoes as well as some recipes to use. I used the search terms of "canned tomatoes" + processing" in Google and it provided quite a bit of material to check.

    I hope this proves helpful in your quest to use your bountiful crop!! <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>


    "Peace begins with a smile. "-- Mother Teresa

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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    OK, I have to reveal some ignorance.


    What, exactly is a "food mill ?" and are their any other kitchen tools that might be used to substitute for one ?


    Thank you

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    A food mill, in rough terms, is a strainer with a crank built in that pushes stuff through the strainer. Ideal for getting the seeds out of blackberry jam or dealing with papery garlic skins (if you don't believe in peeling). This one at Williams-Sonoma looks amazingly fancier than the one we used growing up, which was a single unit that didn't allow for different textures.

  10. #10
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    Oven dried tomatoes taste just as good as the "sun dried" ones you buy at exorbitant prices. Halve the toms, place the halves on a baking tray, and out in the oven at about 80-90 degrees Celsius. Leave for about four hours. You can then freeze them or keep them for a couple of weeks in a jar of olive oil. We have a bumper crop this year here in Devon, and I've turned some into soup, which also freezes well, and some into pasta sauce.

    Pat <img src=/S/chef.gif border=0 alt=chef width=19 height=22>

  11. #11
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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    I might have to investigate the food mill that Jefferson pointed to! It would be more useful then the strainer that Mom and I used for tomato juice (or for grape juice). I have the picture attached. This is not the original strainer as it is a little bit smaller and newer but the wooden press is the original. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>

    [i]As a side note - During the winter months, Mom would put up all the breakables in our large family room, bring out the hand sized bean bags that we would use for balls and provide us with this wooden press to use as a bat! We four girls would play "baseball" and have a wonderful time! It is interesting how one item can bring back so many memories![i] <img src=/S/yep.gif border=0 alt=yep width=15 height=15>


    "Peace begins with a smile. "-- Mother Teresa

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    Re: Sauce from Graden tomatoes

    If I'm not too late to catch the season, I dug out a few recipes in anticipation of our pending bumper crop <IMG SRC=http://members.aol.com/browrob549/emo/chores006.gif> down here.

    TOMATO SAUCE SICILIAN STYLE

    Served with pasta, this quantity is sufficient for 500g of pasta. A good sauce with grilled or barbequed meats or poultry.

    <table border=0><td>1 small eggplant</td><td>1 clove garlic</td><td>salt</td><td>1 red pepper</td><td>1.25kg ripe tomatoes</td><td>4 basil leaves or pinch dried basil</td><td>hot water</td><td>4 anchovy fillets (optional)</td><td>1/3 cup olive oil</td><td>freshly ground pepper</td></table>

    Peel eggplant, cut into fine dice. Place in bowl, sprinkle with salt and leave at least 30 minutes. Drain well, se aside. Place tomatoes in bowl and cover with hot water, leave for 1 minute. Remove from water, peel, roughly chop and puree in blender or sieve. Heat oil and sautee garlic until golden, then discard garlic.

    Add eggplant, simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occassionally. Add tomatoes, chopped red pepper and basil and cook, uncovered, simmering for 40 minutes or until sauce is thick. Add anchovies, if liked, and simmer a further 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    CHUNKY TOMATO SAUCE

    A fresh, chunky tomato sauce, good with poached chicken, turkey and fish. For a light luncheon dish, put the sauce in a ramekin lightly greased, make a hollow and break an egginto the centre, then bake gently in a moderate oven until egg is set, about 7-10 minutes.

    <table border=0><td>4 firm ripe tomatoes</td><td>1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce</td><tr><td>3 tablespoons olive oil</td><td>1 tablespoon chopped spring onions</td><tr><td>1 teaspoon Dijon mustard</td><td>2 tablespoons chopped parsley</td><tr><td>1 clove garlic, crushed</td><td>1 teaspoon chopped fresh basil or oregano</td><tr><td>salt and pepper</td><td></td></table>

    Place tomatoes in small heatproof bowl, cover in boiling water for 12 seconds, then plunge into cold water to cool.

    FRESH TOMATO SAUCE

    This light, fresh tasting sauce is very versatile. Serve it with vegetables, sauteed veal, roast beef and with chicken liver mousse.

    <table border=0><tr><td>4 medium tomatoes</td><td>1 teaspoon tomato paste</td><td>1 teaspoon olive oil</td><td>bouquet garni</td><td>1 clove garlic</td><td>2/3 cup chicken stock</td><td>1 spring onion</td><td></td></table>

    Peel tomatoes and cut in half. Squeeze tomatoes gently to remove seeds and excess juice. Heat okive oil in a saucepan, add crushed garlic and chopped spring onion and cook 2-3 minutes. Add chopped tomatoes, tomato paste, bouquet garni and stock, cook over gentle heat for 15 minutes. Remove bouquet garni and puree the sauce in a blender. Check seasoning and if sauce is too thin return to pan and reduce by boiling.

    Alan

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