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  1. #1
    Star Lounger
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    Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    I am working in Powerpoint and Excel 2002. I have an embedded Excel chart in my powerpoint slide (not linked). Is there a way to find out what the original source file was?

    Thanks,
    Alex

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    If the Excel chart is embedded, there is - by definition - no link to the original source file. You can try the following, but it's not guaranteed to yield useful information:
    - Right-click the Excel chart.
    - Select Chart Object > Open...
    - The chart will be opened in Excel.
    - Select File | Properties.
    - If the author of the original file had entered properties such as title, subject, keywords and author, you'll see them here.
    - After closing the Properties window, select File | Close and return to <name>.ppt

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    For linked objects, I'm sure there is a better way, but this is what I've been doing.

    1. Select the shape
    2. Open the Visual Basic Editor using Alt+F11, and open the Immediate window using Ctrl+G
    3. Query the path to the source using:

    ?ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange(1).LinkFormat.S ourceFullPath

    That's not the real exact text because I just throw that up from memory, but as you type each period, you get a list of your options from there.

  4. #4
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    Ok. Got it. I had already tried what you suggested. I thought the name of the original file would be preserved somewhere.

    Thanks
    -Alex

  5. #5
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    Ok. Your nifty trick works with linked objects, as you say. Too bad a originalpath and originalfilename variables are not saved for embedded files.

    Thanks,
    -Alex

  6. #6
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    A couple of related questions:

    I haven't read up on the subject and don't have the time to do it right now. I am sure there are pros and cons to each type of pasting (embed vs linked). I am guessing without further reading the following:
    1) You can control whether a Linked graph gets updated (when powerpoint opens it'll ask you if you want to update the chart)
    2) A Link to a graph will get mangled if the original gets moved, but not if the .ppt file moves.
    What the consequence of the mangling? orphaning or something more dire (big empty spot?).

    Not a big deal, just curious. Would read up on these issues but not right now as I am in the middle of writing. Thanks for any help.

    Thanks,
    ALex

  7. #7
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    You could try this. Using Microsoft Word, File>Open, change the file type drop-down to Recover Text from Any File (*.*), then open your presentation. When I used the photo album feature in PPT 2003, this was the way I was able to determine the linked photo paths so I could rebuild the presentation. Who knows what else might lurk in the file's metadata? Good luck! And remember the next time you use Word's File>Open dialog to change the drop-down back to Word documents or you'll get a real shock. <img src=/S/wink.gif border=0 alt=wink width=15 height=15>

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    Some tips about linked objects:
    <UL><LI>A linked object is useful if the source is still subject to change.
    <LI>You can specify whether updating is automatic or manual in Edit | Links...
    <LI>If you set updating to manual, you won't be prompted whether you want to update the link when you open the presentation.
    <LI>To update a link manually, select Edit | Links... and click Update Now, or right-click the object and select Update Link.
    <LI>Even with a linked object, a picture of the object is stored in the presentation, so that the presentation can be displayed if the source is unavailable.
    <LI>If you are certain that the source will not be changed any more, or if the source is not available any more, select Edit | Links... and click Break Link. This will convert the linked object to a picture.
    <LI>If the source has been moved or renamed, select Edit | Links... and click Change Source...[/list]HTH

  9. #9
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    Re: Where is the original excel file? (2002)

    Ah, it was worth a try. No luck though. I can only find "linked" charts... If the embedded chart filename is in the metadata it's well hidden.

  10. #10
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    Manual vs Automatic Updating - Global setting?

    Hans,

    Thanks so much for the quick tips. That's exactly what I needed. I am tempted to proceed with "links" for pasted excel charts (they are subject to change). A couple of related questions:

    (1) Updating, manual vs automatic. Is it possible to specificy a default "Manual" behavior for any and all linked objects?
    (2) Related to (1). If I specify "manual" updating, move the presentation (but not the source) to another computer, and then open the presentation at the remote location, will powerpoint still try to find the source and thus break the link (even though the link is in manual mode?). What if I save the file in the remote computer, will Powerpoint then check for the source? i.e. How obcessive is Powerpoint about these files? If it's in Manual mode will it truly ignore them until user says something?
    (3) Any significant other "gotchas" to watch out for with Linked objects?

    Thanks so much. This forum is fantastic.
    - Alex

  11. #11
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Manual vs Automatic Updating - Global setting?

    1. I don't think you can set updating to manual by default. But see Disable the "Update links" dialog box for a simple macro.

    2/3. You shouldn't have problems, as far as I know, but perhaps Loungers with more experience using PowerPoint can tell more about this.

  12. #12
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    Paste as Link - Borders disappear?

    1) Thanks. I knew there would be a macro somewhere... :-)

    2) Hmm, already noticed a weird formatting issue - when I use "paste as link", the bottom and right hand border of the chart sometimes (50/50) disappear. Sometimes they show up again in print preview or slideshow; sometimes they don't come back until I repaste the chart. Very odd. I tried a quick search on google and this forum and saw nothing.

    Darn it. Sounds like "paste as link" may have little bugs or gotchas. May have to return to straight pasting... (incidentally, this is Office 2002 on PC).

    -Alex

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