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  1. #1
    Silver Lounger
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    IE ActiveX Compatibility Flags

    OK, here is another tough question...

    Where can I find a reference to the Internet Explorer ActiveX Compatibility flags? Clearly, 0x00000400 (1024) is the "Kill Bit" (<A target="_blank" HREF=http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q240/7/97.ASP>http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/ar...s/Q240/7/97.ASP</A>), but if you check your registry at "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftInternet ExplorerActiveX Compatibility", you will find several other flags listed. I cannot find a single GOOD and COMPLETE reference to this information at *.microsoft.com or through google.

    This data must exist SOMEWHERE!! Does anyone know? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Silver Lounger
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    Re: IE ActiveX Compatibility Flags

    Hmmm... I said it was tough! I guess I can assume this is not something that can be answered here... Does anyone know WHERE I can ask this level of question?

    Thanks for viewing and thanks in advance for any assistance.

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: IE ActiveX Compatibility Flags

    I entered the subject of this thread into <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.google.com/search?q=IE+ActiveX+Compatibility+Flags+&btnG=Goog le+Search>Google</A> and came up with 934 hits.
    I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you are after enough to point to any in particular, but it looks like a rich mix of pickings.
    HTH.

  4. #4
    Silver Lounger
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    Re: IE ActiveX Compatibility Flags

    Thanks, Lief. I have already been through all of those. The problem is that most of them point to or reference the same three (3) Microsoft KB articles. And I cannot find ANYTHING on *.microsoft.com that breaks down what the flags actually are.

    It is much the same with the "Edit Flags" for the Object types in the registry. I can find a partial list at MS, but NOT a complete one!

    This type of information seems to be a well kept secret inside the MS ivory tower. I was hoping some one had cracked their code and was willing to publish it... Probably a pipe dream. Thanks.
    ___________

    As an FYI, this is part of a typcial page that you can find at Google:

    The patch for the eyedog control sets the "kill-bit", which basically means this control will be considered invalid by any browser which has applied the patch.


    In the <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.microsoft.com/security/bulletins/ms99-032faq.asp>http://www.microsoft.com/security/bu...s99-032faq.asp</A> document, Microsoft have provide a little bit of insight into how the kill-bit is set;


    Hive HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWARE
    Key MicrosoftInternet ExplorerActiveX
    Compatibility{6BCFAE33-41AD-11D1-B78F-00C04FC2C5F0}
    Name Compatibility Flags
    Value Dword:00000400


    Supposedly a more detailed description of using this method to revoke ActiveX control is going to be found in the new KB article;

    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q240/7/97.asp>http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/ar...s/q240/7/97.asp</A>
    _____________

    This references 2 of the 3 MSKB articles. All these articles discuss about Compatibility Flags is how to set the "Kill Bit".

    The "Kill Bit" is obviously the eleventh bit from the right, as a Dword (double-word) of 0x00000400 in binary is equal to: 10000000000.

    That leaves at least ten other bits NOT specified. And the actual Compatibility Flag field is much larger than this! The highest Compatibility Flag set in the registry is for a Dword of 0x00200000 -- or in binary 1000000000000000000000. That is 22 bits in size. And so far, Microsoft has informed us that bit #11 is the Kill Bit. What and the other 21 bits for?

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