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  1. #1
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    Outlook 2002 Denies Hyperlinks

    With Outlook 2002 installed, a click on any hyperlink within Outlook generates a message: "This operation has been cancelled due to restrictions in effect on this computer. Please contact your system administrator.'
    Unfortunately I am the system administrator, albeit still neophyte.
    I am running the 30-day trial Office XP using W2K Professional. I have Ken Slovak's add-in installed, but have done nothing except to try to understand the hyperlink issue. Slipstick.com did say that Exchange 5.5 customers, of which we are one, had to buy "a retail copy" of XP or Exchange 2000 and CALs. Is the 30-day trial not considered "retail"?
    Could the Exchange 5.5 be causing the problem? I uninstalled O 2002 this morning, reinstalled it with everything except Help at "Install on first use", and had the same problem. Using Outlook offline made no difference.
    I am now back to Outlook 2000 with no problems. My concern is that we are hoping to upgrade by the end of this year from Office--including Outlook--97. (Only I have Office 2K, on my personal laptop.) Since I am very much guided by Woody's Watches, I do not want Office 2000 SP-2 and I certainly want the staff out of '97.
    Any thoughts or suggestions would be most appreciated.

  2. #2
    Platinum Lounger
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    Re: Outlook 2002 Denies Hyperlinks

    I think you're confusing a few issues.

    The CAL issue is for installing site wide using the "a" switch and also to be legal. (It's a free upgrade for only Exchange 2000). That has nothing to do with your problem. It's a roll out issue only.

    I don't think the addin is a problem either. that just unblocks attachments so you can access them.

    Your problem is urls aren't loading IE. The error message reads that opening urls from outlook is prohibited using system policies. Are these text urls written out in the body of a message or only attachments?

  3. #3
    Platinum Lounger
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    Re: Outlook 2002 Denies Hyperlinks

    an internset search on the phrase"This operation has been cancelled due to restrictions in effect on this computer" bring up a lot of hits.

    This url probably gives the best answer, it's IE's system policies. (I knew it was a policy issue, but wasn't aware it was IE doing it.) I don't really understand why it is only a problem in OL2002, unless the upgrade installed a new version or woke a sleeping giant. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>

    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.netmag.co.uk/qanda_details.asp?id=22210>http://www.netmag.co.uk/qanda_details.asp?id=22210</A>

  4. #4
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    Re: Outlook 2002 Denies Hyperlinks

    Many thanks for the research on my behalf. I checked the URL you referenced and found neither of the registry keys mentioned. I have spent virtually all day checking web sites without finding anything that could be used to solve my problem.
    This is what I have discovered:
    1) The error message is headed "Microsoft Outlook". In testing Attachment Security Options, the warning dialog box was headed "Attachment Security Options".
    2) I set *.htm to be opened by IE6. All my files that were saved as *.htm open and the hyperlinks work.
    3) My hyperlinks work with IE6 and Outlook 2000.
    4) I hit the same error message at Control Panel | Mail | Outlook Data Files | Open folder.
    5) Attachment Security Options works beautifully.
    jbs

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