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  1. #1
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    Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Due to email space constraints at work, I need to save emails to my hard drive. I have copied them all over by having Outlook open along with explorer and dragging and dropping them onto my data drive. Here's my question: is there a way to create a new folder in the Outlook folder list that points to my data drive? I'm hoping to be able to save my emails direct to this data folder just with Outlook open.

    Thank-you.

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    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    I'm guessing that 2003 is the same as 2002, or similar enough to do the same...

    Right-click the Outlook Bar > Outlook Bar Shortcut...
    and select Look In: File System.
    Find the folder you want, and you should be able to drag items to it directly from your Inbox or wherever.

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Thanks Leif.

    I think 02 is different than 03 as I can't find anything similar to what you are describing. I don't have an Outlook Bar or if I do, it's not activated. I did a sweep through the help files and it only refers to creating an additional public folder. I've even right clicked in every conceivable area to see if something would pop up that would help but so far nothing.

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Yes, 2003 is different, see <!post=this thread,376120>this thread<!/post>.
    -John ... I float in liquid gardens
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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Thanks John.

    Prior to reading your post, I went through the help files again. I've been reading about Personal Storage files and wondered if you or anyone else has had any experience with them. To be honest, it does sound as though these PST files are exactly what I'm looking for: a way to keep emails (and still view them within Outlook) but not store them on the server.

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    There are a number of contributors to this forum who use PST's as a regular part of using Outlook. One notorious individual keeps a number of PST's open at all times. <img src=/S/invisible.gif border=0 alt=invisible width=15 height=15>

    I think that using a PST to maintain your messages is a better route than saving each individual message to a hard drive; it saves file space, and helps you organize your message history. Since you don't have a PST, I'm assuming that you are now on Exchange Server (if you are on a standalone machine you can't work without a PST).

    Setting up a PST in 2003 is as easy as these steps: From the main Outlook Application window Select File | Data File Management | Add

    You'll be given the option to create either the most recent unicode capable PST, or a backwards compatible non-unicode PST. If you are sure that you don't need backwards compatibility, select the latest format "Office Outlook Personal Folders File".

    Walk through the wizard/steps of creating the PST;

    - name the PST file name something appropriate such as <your LAN username>.PST,

    - I recommend that you use compressible encryption so that the file self compresses, but not high encryption,

    - don't password protect your file unless you have a need for high security, as Outlook will require the password every time it starts up, and if you forget the password you are in trouble.

    - give your PST an "internal name" that you would like to see in the Folder List - something like "<your LAN username> PST 1"

    When you are done you will see your new PST listed in the Folders list of the Outlook navigation pane. You can change the name and some other things by right clicking the top level PST folder and selecting "Properties".

    If you encounter problems at any point, post back.

    Now that you have a PST, you need to learn about these capabilities, and think about how you want to implement them:

    1. Managing your messages via folder structure and categories
    2. Archiving

    You'll find a couple of major threads discussing philosophies for these issues in this Forum.
    -John ... I float in liquid gardens
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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Thanks John.

    I've just finished reading this MS article, http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?...kb;en-us;297019, and now I'm confused. Is this article saying that .PST's shouldn't be used as a permanent solution to email size management? Also, am I correct when I say that the .PST files are NOT on the server? If they aren't on the server, why would it be a problem to use .PST files for long-term email storage? I'm just trying to have as much information at hand as possible for when I go to my IT director with this. Thanks for your time/education with this one!

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    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    I think that MSKB article is rather old. You can store .pst folders on your hard disk, or in a network folder. I have been using .pst files on a network folder for years on my work PC, and I don't see any performance problems. My employer imposes a limit on the amount of storage each user has on the Exchange server, so I move most of my e-mails to a personal folders file.

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Thanks, Hans.

    I'll just take a deep breath and go see my IT director now....(he's notorious for saying "no" to most everything!)

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Deb

    I know I have joined this thread quite late but I store ALL of my emails in a pst file on my local hard drive. Other users store theirs on the network so that they can work from home and connect to our works network. The beauty of storing them in a pst file as opposed to a folder structure is one of size as the pst reduces the format size. If you transfer from one PC to another PC you can take the pst file with you and the folder structure remains as it was. So my personal view is to remain with pst not folder structure
    Jerry

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Thanks Jerry. That's very helpful having your take on .PST files. I appreciate everyone taking the time to bring me up to speed on this.

    Deb

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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Hey now! Who are you going to believe, me (a total stranger) or Microsoft (motto: "secure computing")? <img src=/S/laugh.gif border=0 alt=laugh width=15 height=15> Just kidding.

    Interestingly in my company the default is to set a PST for users which is in the users private storage space on the server side, and we are largely a "whatever MS recommends" shop. The problems with having a PST on the server are:

    1. it's a pain if the server is unavailable
    2. as the PST gets larger performance slows down. In my experience, running the PST cleanup utility "scanpst.exe" against a local server side PST is abysmally slow. This gets way worse if the server is not local; running across a WAN is likely to perform very poorly.

    The MSKB implies that PST's should be on the local computer, and you will find that to be the best option for performance. The problem with having a PST locally is that it doesn't get backed up with corporate server backup activity. Also, if MS believes " .pst files are not meant to be a long-term, continuous-use method of storing messages in an enterprise environment" they are flying in the face of practical usage of PST files by most large corporations, and if MS doesn't "support" PST's as a long term storage solution, you have to wonder why a substantial amount of data can be kept in a PST, including "hidden"information, and wonder why a PST is the default storage for a standalone computer.

    What I would do is tell your IT Manager that you have corporate ecorrespondence with a future value that needs to be retained for record retention policy and other legal reasons , and he has two options: enable PST's, or enlarge the server space. (Only, you should be more polite than me.)
    -John ... I float in liquid gardens
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  13. #13
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    Re: Save emails to hard drive (2003)

    Good one John!

    Apparently I know my IT guy quite well as his answer, almost before all the words were out of my mouth, was no. (That's OK...IT people like to say no initially - it's just their nature <img src=/S/wink.gif border=0 alt=wink width=15 height=15>).

    I think he just doesn't have enough information on it, so I sent him a whack of stuff to read. In his defense, we do have a lot of restrictions as our email system is housed by a third party that governs 42 of our offices province wide. However, I'm not finished working on him yet so I may be able to use this solution yet. Thanks again to all.

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