Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    98
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Microsoft Office (general question)

    I know I need to learn and become comfortable with Microsoft (I prefer WordPerfect), but it is very confusing. When I apply for jobs, it is stated that one must be proficient with Word, Excel, and Access, but does not state which version. So what version do I study?
    I am intelligent enough to figure out where a function is in the many submenus, but when forced to take those idiotic MS tests that are computerized, one is not given the grace to make one or two erroneous mouse clicks. A wrong click is a wrong answer. Word seems to have changed the location of various functions, so in one version, a function might be under "Edit," while in another that same function is under "format." Add to this confusion that my computer runs on Windows XP, so I cannot run an older, more commonly used version of MS Office.
    I would appreciate any words of wisdom from those who love and are comfortable with MicroSoft.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Renton, Washington, USA
    Posts
    12,560
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Re: Microsoft Office (general question)

    Running Windows XP, you can run Office 97 through 2003, without any problems. You may even be able to run Office 95, but I would not try it.

    What version do you think is the MOST "common" being used?

    In general, any version you learn SHOULD apply to any of the others with a few advance differences. I would suggest to learn the version that you have or can get.

    Now running HP Pavilion a6528p, with Win7 64 Bit OS.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Silicon Valley, USA
    Posts
    23,112
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 93 Times in 89 Posts

    Re: Microsoft Office (general question)

    I recommend learning Office 2003. It's quite similar to Office 2002 (XP) in most important respects, and there will be a new version of Office out in the next year or so that will be reasonably similar to Office 2003. If you get stuck in an environment that uses Word 2000, you'll survive. <img src=/S/smile.gif border=0 alt=smile width=15 height=15>

    But... how to master it. I've learned Office the hard way, by doing actual work with it for 12 years. To get into the Word way of thinking about documents, you might consider courseware or classes. I like computer books for reference, but I find most of them rather tedious reading (the "friends of ED" web design books actually make good reading).

  4. #4
    Platinum Lounger
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    A Magic Forest in Deepest, Darkest Kent
    Posts
    5,681
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Re: Microsoft Office (general question)

    Hi there

    I see your problem and it is a difficult one. My company has been using Office 97 since it was published and it is only the IT departments who have kept up to date with the newer versions plus a few departments where there has been a need. This is only because the company is very short of money, this will change very soon as new budgets get to work.

    In my experience in teaching and helping users in the work place the general day to day work stuff is exactly the same apart from a few enhancements and changes to the interface. I have seen people change very quickly to newer versions.

    I taught the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) for a short period and I know what you mean by frustrating electronic tests with no flexibility as they used electronic tests using flash. My old boss used to drive me mad, as he used to press the mouse button through various menus to get to a specific thing when there was a short cut in the start menu, he would get mad at me as I would do something a different way after a while we called it quits as we knew we always got to the final outcome just by doing it a different way. There is no right way, just different methods of doing it <img src=/S/dizzy.gif border=0 alt=dizzy width=15 height=15>

    All I can say is before your interview you may want to call the HR department and ask them what version of software they use in the company so that you can nip down to the local library/friend to have a quick revision on the system. I would also ask the definition of the word "proficient" I have had people who have been employed because they had "knowledge of access" and were employed to design small databases and then they found that she was once a data inputter using Access...no knowledge of design at all.

    I don't know if there is a similar qualification as the ECDL in the USA so bottom line is...prove your ability of Microsoft products by getting a qualification even if it is an evening class, if you cock up the exam at the test you can still show the certificate to prove that you are able and adaptable. my <img src=/S/2cents.gif border=0 alt=2cents width=15 height=15> worth
    Jerry

  5. #5
    Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    98
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: Microsoft Office (general question)

    Thank you to ALL of you for your good advice. I have Word 2000. I shot myself in the foot not learning Word while working full-time. The reason? I had many documents created in WordPerfect, including laboratory manuals with graphics composed of hundreds of pages. Every time I tried to convert them to Word, it was a big mess. So I chose to stick with WordPerfect with my boss' blessing. I have taken classes...those two-day jobbies that teach next to nothing. <img src=/S/disappointed.gif border=0 alt=disappointed width=15 height=15>
    Thanks again. You all have given me a lot of food for thought.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •