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  1. #1
    New Lounger
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    MS Exchange (2003)

    We are getting ms exchange put on our machines, and the program seems to be nothing but surprises and pitfalls. I have seen several books on how to work with exchange from the administrator's perspective, but does anyone know of a good book to buy that teaches end users how to handle this ugly pos program?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: MS Exchange (2003)

    Hmmm, one step at a time. Have you been using Outlook with an Internet mail account (e.g., POP3 account)? Working with an Exchange mailbox has several important differences from a POP mail account, but for the most part you don't lose any functionality. If you haven't been using Outlook at all, then there will be many differences from other mail clients (whether Outlook Express or non-Microsoft clients). Perhaps you could describe a few of the things you dislike and people can suggest fixes or workarounds. Or maybe, if it becomes intolerable, you will need to consider "Plan B" (escaping from this company!). <img src=/S/wink.gif border=0 alt=wink width=15 height=15>

  3. #3
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    Re: MS Exchange (2003)

    We were using regular old outlook with POP. What happened was, the person turning on exchange did not tell me about how mail would be routed, how to access my .pst file that they stopped using (apparently they set a new location for the pst and did not place the old one there, hence I lost all of my old mail) or how to ensure that when I checked mail from my home or on the road, that I would be able to get the same mail that I would at work.

    I did find out a couple of things just recently, that the 200 meg limit on the inbox is not negotiable, and that I need to automatically archive my mail to ensure that I do not hit that limit. Problem is, I will hit that limit every couple of weeks! I am always getting into my mail history to look things up and frequently go back a year or more for information. Now I have to figure out where my old pst file is, and how to access it so that I can look up old information. Yes, the old pst file is huge: ~~2 gigs.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: MS Exchange (2003)

    We were shocked at the tiny aggregate mailbox size for Exchange 2003 Standard Edition and were forced to buy the considerably pricier Enterprise Edition to avoid the type of low-megabyte limit hassles you describe. Perhaps you can ask your IT management to find a few thousand dollars to upgrade so that they can reap the benefits of centralized backup and remote access (assuming your mail is worth saving).

    Added: You will now have an OST file that mirrors your server-based mailbox, and you can create as many PST files as you like to aid in organizing your archives. The Outlook add-in program Lookout (acquired by Microsoft, discontinued, then made available again) improves search functionality across multiple PSTs. Or you could try Google Desktop or another similar search product. I personally haven't tried either one.

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