Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    New Lounger
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    I am starting a company on a shoestring budget. I used a font in Word for my logo/letterhead, but when I was at a customers location, the quote that I emailed to him had a different font. Apparently his computer did not have the font that I selected, and used a font that was available. Is there a way to set the top portion of computer "stationary" as a graphic to insure that everyone's computer prints my letterhead in the format that I chose?

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    10,550
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Re: 'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    I'm not sure how to do this on Word 2000, but on Word 2003 you could include the characters in your header by using

    Tools > Options > Save
    set the options for "Embed Truetype Fonts", "Embed characters in use only" and "Do not embed common system fonts"

    StuartR

  3. #3
    Plutonium Lounger
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    84,353
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts

    Re: 'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    Welcome to Woody's Lounge!

    The easiest way out is to use only fonts that are available on any Windows PC, such as Times New Roman, Arial, Verdana etc.

    You can also specify that TrueType fonts used in the document (except for System fonts) are included in the document. This is done in the Save tab of Tools | Options... Be aware that this will significantly increase the size of your document.

    Or you can create your letterhead/logo in a graphics application, and insert it as a picture in your document.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Silicon Valley, USA
    Posts
    23,112
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 93 Times in 89 Posts

    Re: 'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    > Is there a way to set the top portion of computer "stationary" as a graphic to insure that everyone's computer
    > prints my letterhead in the format that I chose?

    There are a number of ways to create a graphical version of text in a Word document. For example, you could print to PDF (using a free or non-free print driver) and then import that into a graphical editor (free or non-free) and trim it down to the part you want and save it as a GIF, PNG, or BMP. Then you can create a new template and insert the graphic into the header.

    Added: Note: I would use Photoshop Elements 2 or 3 for this. I don't know what Picasa or Irfanview or ImageMagick or other "free" programs can do.

  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Zoetermeer, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands
    Posts
    559
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Re: 'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    Yet another way: compose your letterhead with floating graphics, select the entire letterhead including graphics and put that on the clipboard. Then put the cursor where you want it to appear, click Paste special... in the menu and choose Picture (enhanced metafile). This puts your letterhead as a graphic in your Word document.
    (Menu captions translated from Dutch, so maybe not entirely correct.)

  6. #6
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    3,853
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 259 Times in 239 Posts

    Re: 'locking' a font (Office 2000)

    I'm not convinced that this wouldn't still require the font - the text would not necessarily be converted to curves by pasting as a metafile. If you chose the Paste Special option to paste as a Bitmap, the result would be completely independent of the typeface and not have the filesize overhead of embedding fonts.

    If you don't have the option to paste as a bitmap and have only standard MS Office, I would display the graphic on screen at the highest zoom possible showing the entire logo and then press the PrtScr button and then paste that output and crop in the edges. Pasting the screen capture into MS Photo Editor would allow you to downsample the colour depth and crop so that the resulting file size is optimised but this may be a bit tricky if you have never used photo software before.
    Andrew Lockton, Chrysalis Design, Melbourne Australia

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •