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  1. #1
    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    CD copying and Ripping

    If I've got several recordings (homemade) that I want on CD, is there any way to do it in the "commercial" format -- the "CDA" format that music CD's bought retail are in?

    Or is it just another extension for a known format?

    Regards,
    Chuck Billow
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    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    I'm not an expert in this area, but you can burn so-called "music CDs" (i.e. CDA) with a number of CD burning programs but it depends on the file format of the originals. What is the file format of these "homemade recordings" that you have, i.e. MP3, WAV, or what?

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    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Al:

    They're MP3 or wav mostly...

    Regards,
    Chuck
    -------------------------------------------------
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    You can use iTunes. Add those MP3s and WAVs to your iTunes library and then add them to a playlist sorted the way you like and then burn the playlist to an audio CD. I'm sure Windows Media Player now has the same feature, as well as lots of other programs.

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    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Jefferson:

    But are they burning in a "CDA" file format, or "just" burning the MPS (or whatever) to the CD?

    Regards,
    Chuck
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    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    iTunes is almost idiot proof when it comes to making audio CDs. (Your regular CD burning software might give you a choice of audio or data. What you want is audio.) As for the underlying file format(s) on an audio CD, I have no idea, but trust me, they play in a CD player that pre-dates MP3s.

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    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    OK, thanks Jefferson.

    I wonder if there's a difference between "CDA" file formats, and others? As far as quality, I mean...

    Regards,
    Chuck
    -------------------------------------------------
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

  8. #8
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    When you burn an audio CD, the tracks will be written as CDA (Compact Disk Audio) files. This is the format used on the music CDs you can buy in a record store, i.e. it can be played in the CD player in your stereo system.

    CDA is a less compressed, i.e. higher quality format than MP3, but if the source is an MP3, quality won't improve by burning as CDA.

    If you use a program such as Nero or Roxio, make sure that you select the option to close the CD after recording, otherwise it can't be played in regular CD players. And don't burn at the highest available speed.

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    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Got it.

    Thanks, Hans.

    Regards,
    Chuck
    -------------------------------------------------
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Sorry to get back after the party's over, but Jefferson and Hans have given you the answers you wanted. I only respond to say that I use Nero to burn audio CDs and it does create CDA files that can be played in any player. The only problem I've ever had is, for example, a few CDs I keep in my car that I made in this manner from MP3 files on my computer. The MP3 songs were ripped from lots of different music disks I own. Well, the other day I stuck one of 'em in the car player and one of the tracks was badly garbled at the beginning of a song. After 10 or 15 seconds it started playing the rest of the song clearly. I know that didn't used to happen with that CD for I've played it in the car on other occasions and the MP3 version on my computer is nice and clear. The question I don't know the answer to is whether homemade disks like that can deteriorate with time or if there might be something "wrong" with my car's player.

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    Uranium Lounger CWBillow's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Al:

    Well, as long as I double-check the copy at creation time, I should be OK... thanks.

    Regards,
    Chuck
    -------------------------------------------------
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience - well, that comes from poor judgment."

    ~ A(lan) A(lexander) Milne (1882-1956)- "House at Pooh Corner"

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    Super Moderator jscher2000's Avatar
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    There's one CD where I like to fast forward and replay a lot. It seems to hop, skip, and jump after a while, maybe because something is getting hot? After playing a different CD for a while, when I switch back, it's fine again. By the way, it is inexpensive CD-R rather than CD-RW in my scenario...

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    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Thanks for those points, Ricky! Good stuff to ponder...

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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    Al -

    Here are links to three web sites (among many) that cover the lifespans of CDRs: Audioholics, Melbourne PC, Amazon Article

    The quality of the media is certainly a factor in regards to life span. I have bought very cheap CDRs and in the end, I would only use them for sharing data files (like we used to do with floppies). The bargain-bin CDRs are not for people who want to make nice audio CDs for their car or stereo.

    Dust particles on the optic [in the player] can cause skipping or repeating (like a scratched record). An air duster is the simplest solution for this. If the garbled audio always comes up at the same point in the same song, I would say the problem is with the disc or the recording.

    When you are using your PC to make an audio CD, you should not use the PC for "anything else" while the recording is in process. Doing something as harmless as checking email while Nero or MusicMatch is making a disc will almost always lead to a flaw in the recording.

    One last point: An audio CD created from wav files will be a much higher quality recording than one made from mp3 files. Move the songs you want from normal CDs to your hard drive as wav files, point your recorder to those files and then you can delete the wav files once the recording is complete. MP3s are nice for mp3 players but are seldom a good source for making an audio CD.

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    Uranium Lounger
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    Re: CD copying and Ripping

    To clarify what Hans mentioned, with the two programs I have experience with, iTunes and MusicMatch Juke Box, you can select what format you want to burn as a default, and per burn. That is you can have CDA as the default burn format, or MP3 as the default, and possibly other options which I don't use, and you can change those defaults for each burn. I rip to an external hard drive at192kbps Variable Bit Rate MP3s using Exact Audio Copy with the latest stable LAME (the LAME DLL is included with EAC)(WAV format will suck up a lot of disk space), and then burn into CDA or MP3 depending on where I will use it, since not everything I use plays MP3's. (So when I burn to an MP3, I'm really just burning a data file of my selected MP3s.)

    Without question, even high quality MP3's will have some quality loss as MP3 is a lossy compression format. There are also (IMO - I'm not inviting an argument) some artifacts in MP3's, even at high quality, because of the psychoacoustic effects of the encoding algorithm, which vary by encoder. With LAME encoder, my personal perception is that some quiet sounds are unnaturally brought louder, while some instrument notes disappear because there are other instruments at identical tones but louder volume, due to the decisions made by the encoding design. However, other music lovers have commented that the other common MP3 encoders are worse than LAME.

    If you want to get obsessive, you could use FLAC, but there's not (yet) a lot of general support for it. (FLAC is very popular with concert bootleggers.)

    I hope to not have bewildered you, in the spirit of helping. My comments will probably make more sense after you have more experience in ripping and burning with different formats.
    -John ... I float in liquid gardens
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