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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Transient POST alarm

    I've recently upgraded my dad's PC, and the motherboard alarm goes off for a couple of minutes each time the units booted from cold. It doesn't happen if it restarts, or even turn off and then on again, as long as the interval between the two isn't two long (maybe up to an hour). I've looked at all the values exposed in the BIOS and through SpeedFan, and they all seem OK.

    Everything works fine, it's just most annoying.

    Anybody had a similar experience, or able to guess what might be causing this? I can't find any reference to the problem on the abit site. I've tried disconnecting all cards other than the graphics card, all peripherals, and running on one stick of RAM, but the problem persists. It almost seems to be that the Mobo's alarming because something's too cold!

    For info - Abit SR7-8x motherboard, P4 1.7GHz processor, 1GB RAM.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Transient POST alarm

    Does the motherboard report fan speeds? It could be that one of your fans takes a few seconds to get up to speed, and that you have an under-speed alarm. If this has started some time after installing the PC then it may be that the fan's bearings are starting to go.

    StuartR

  3. #3
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    Re: Transient POST alarm

    Thanks Stuart,

    I'd wondered about this, but then I thought it should happen every time I turn the computer on (but not necessarily at restarts), rather than only when it's been off for some time. It's a brand new fan, so it shouldn't be a bearings issue.

  4. #4
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Transient POST alarm

    Maybe it's ok when warm, but takes a while to free up when it's cold? I'd certainly start by trying a different fan if you have one - or see if the BIOS will let you turn off fan speed sensing and see if this clears the problem - if so then you still need to replace the fan but it might be a good diagnostic step.

    StuartR

  5. #5
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    Re: Transient POST alarm

    Although I agree with Stuart that this sounds like a fan issue, you need to determine the beep pattern and then check the Beep Codes to see what the BIOS is really yelling at you about. Next time you reboot, watch the display to determine the BIOS maker, then listen for a pattern. 4 longs and 1 short. 3 shorts over and over, etc. Then check the code for that BIOS at BIOS Central. These codes may end up pointing you to the RAM, video, or even the CPU.

    <hr>I'd wondered about this, but then I thought it should happen every time I turn the computer on (but not necessarily at restarts), rather than only when it's been off for some time. It's a brand new fan, so it shouldn't be a bearings issue.<hr>
    Unless you paid $20 for a premium fan, such as a Papst, don't count on it being good just because it is new. Most OEM fans cost a couple bucks wholesale and typically have cheap sleeve bearings instead of precision ball bearings found in the better fans. This sounds like a fan that barely has enough power to overcome the cold (and hardened) grease when first turned on. But after it has warmed up a bit, the grease's viscosity decreases and it easily overcomes the friction. So I would suspect the BIOS is yelling at you telling you the fan is turning too slow.

    However, IF this is a "quiet" fan, they tend to turn at a slower RPM. It may just be that the alarm threshold setting is just set too low and that can be changed in the BIOS - just don't change the alarm setting to shut up the alarm - that would be like ignoring the HOT idiot light in your car.

    Speedfan is typically pretty reliable, if it is properly configured for your motherboard. Note that many motherboards come with a utility disk that includes a hardware monitor for that board. You might want to look there, or at the maker's website.

    Do note that this might not be a fan either as there are many things that are affected by heat. I would do a good visual inspection and make sure your RAM is securely inserted too - even going as far as pulling the RAM and reinserting it to ensure good contact - after shutting down, and UNPLUGGING the power supply, and ensuring I was fully discharged of static.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    Heat is the bane of all electronics!

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