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  1. #1
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    Web Publishing (2000)

    I have published my web site to two separate free web hosts (Tripod and 20m) and I have the same problem with both. I signed on, connected and published OK and the dialogue box at the end said it was "Done". I can log in to the web site of each Host and use the File Manager in each. But when I try to view my web site through IE or Netscape I get the "can't find the URL" message! Possibly the problem is in my index.htm file. It is a simple frames file combining a left.htm and a mainframe.htm file. I can view each separately in the File Manager of each Host but when I try to view index.htm I get the "can't find URL message". Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger Leif's Avatar
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    Re: Web Publishing (2000)

    What do you get if you 'Preview in Browser' from the File menu in FP?
    I suspect it is something quite straightforward. Make a copy of index.htm and call it default.htm and see what happens.
    (Default.htm takes precedence over index.htm when you browse to www.yourdomain.com without specifying a page.)
    Post your url(s) and we'll see if we can spot anything from here.

  3. #3
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    Re: Web Publishing (2000)

    <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by WebGenii on 17-Jul-01 17:19.</FONT></P>Tried that without any success. The urls are <A target="_blank" HREF=http://waimeatrampingclub.20m.com>http://waimeatrampingclub.20m.com</A> and <A target="_blank" HREF=http://waimeatrampingclub.tripod.com>http://waimeatrampingclub.tripod.com</A>. Incidentally emails to customer support in both cases have remained unanswered. I only chose these hosts because they appeared to have a good reputation, were free (the club is strapped for cash), and the urls you end up with are readable. Can you recommend a better host?

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    Re: Web Publishing (2000)-MULTI-Re: Web Publishing (2000)

    Roger when I click on the links in your message I get an error on the 20m site, as it's looking for a page called mainframe.htm which doesn't exist. When looking at the source I see the right frame needs to be saved as default as was earlier mentioned. <FRAME SRC="/cgi-bin/framed/2987/left.htm" NAME="left" MARGINWIDTH=10 MARGINHEIGHT=10 SCROLLING=AUTO>
    <FRAME SRC="/cgi-bin/framed/2987/mainframe.htm" NAME="main

    When I click on the Tripod link I was able to load the site ok. Good to see something from my old home town!!!!!

    Good luck <img src=/S/bingo.gif border=0 alt=bingo width=15 height=22> <img src=/S/hello.gif border=0 alt=hello width=25 height=29>

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    Re: Web Publishing (2000)-MULTI-Re: Web Publishing (2000)

    Thanks for your help. I gave up on the 20m site but I got the Tripod one fixed after getting a clue from the Geocities site. When I tried to upload to the site through Front Page it was rejected because I hadn't activated Front Page Extensions. Being a novice I didn't understand that so when it threw me back into ftp I tried that and the files uploaded OK. But according to Geocities if you try and upload to a ftp site through Front Page the file extensions become irreparably damaged. Sure enough, when I uploaded them again through the Tripod servlet they worked. But not before I renamed them all lower case with an html rather than an htm extension. The Tripod servlet can't handle files with spaces or odd characters, and Tripod is fussy about case particularly with URLs, and Tripod responds to index.html NOT index htm. Took me hours and hours to find all that out but everything is working now. Thanks
    Roger

  6. #6
    Super Moderator WebGenii's Avatar
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    Re: Web Publishing (2000)-MULTI-Re: Web Publishing (2000)

    Just a little background information on file naming. I give this spiel every time I teach a FrontPage or HTML course. So please forgive me if it sounds a little "canned".

    <font face="Comic Sans MS">Web designers not only have to know about web design - they have to learn about web servers as well. One of the areas where you have to know a little bit about your web server is when naming files.

    Here are 5 things to think about.
    1. <LI>In Windows (95/98/ME/NT/2K) and windows applications, files can have a length of up to 255 characters. As a result FrontPage can save files with file names that are that long. However, take that file and place it on a MacIntosh web server and there will be trouble since they only accept file names that are 32 characters in length.
      By the way - from a human user standpoint, the longer you make your filenames, the more you are asking to have someone make a typo. Keep the filename short and meaningful.
      <LI>In Windows (95/98/ME/NT/2K) and windows applications, there are many special characters which can be used in a filename. Most webservers can not handle anything other than alphanumeric characters.
      If you've ever seen an address like <pre>my% 20 page.htm, the % 20 </pre>

      <font face="Comic Sans MS"> is how the space character is rendered by the web server (in fact I just had to throw extra spaces in that example to make it come out on the Lounge).
      Nobody is going to type that in to get to your page! If you do want to force a separation between words you can use an underscore character _. Stay away from the ~ character, since about 50% of the population has no clue where it is on a keyboard!
      <LI>In Windows the filenames mypage.htm and MyPage.htm would refer to the same page. However place that file in a UNIX environment and they would be seen as two separate pages. UNIX machines are case sensitive. A lot of webservers out there are on UNIX operating systems. This can be totally confusing for the surfing public, since most people are using Mac/PC systems where case is not important; and they would type in mypage.htm when they were really trying to find MyPage.htm. My advice - stick with lowercase and use it religiously. The user shouldn't have to guess what operating system is in use. Most people seem more comfortable with lower case.
      <LI>Do you use .htm or .html as your file extension? This is when you have to talk to your web server administrator - and a good administrator will be prepared to answer your questions. The file extension can be configured by the web server administrator, so it can go either way. Altho' historically the .html extension was found on UNIX machines. If you are using the FrontPage Publish feature to publish your website to a server which supports FrontPage Server Extensions, that is something that the Server Extensions will handle for you. In other words, your system will talk to the server and say "oh! you use .html here" and rename the files for you.
      <LI>The default document. The default document is the page that you see when you go to a website and don't ask for a specific page. For example if you go to <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.webgenii.ca>http://www.webgenii.ca</A> - you haven't asked for a specific web page, and it doesn't matter because the web server has been configured to hand you a default page. In this case, a page called default.htm will be sent to you. Now this default document can also be configured by the web server administrator. Typical default document names are: default.htm, index.htm, home.htm, welcome.htm, default.asp, index.asp, ... you get the picture. Again, if you are using the FrontPage Publish feature to publish your website to a server which supports FrontPage Server Extensions - your system will handle renaming your default document to match the server's requirements.
    </font face=comic>
    Points 4 and 5 explain part of the popularity of FrontPage Server Extensions, they handle a lot of the details for you. If you are using FTP to publish your files, this is the kind of thing you have to do manually. Unfortunately, there are still a lot of ISP's out there who do not want to use FP Server Extensions. In which case, in my opinion, they had better be prepared to talk to their customers and help them out.
    </font face=comic>
    Hope this was useful.
    [b]Catharine Richardson (WebGenii)
    WebGenii Home Page
    Moderator: Spreadsheets, Other MS Apps, Presentation Apps, Visual Basic for Apps, Windows Mobile

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