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  1. #1
    3 Star Lounger
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    Keep Users Legal (Access 2K)

    If you have been able to notice my posts out of thousands posted, you probably guessed that I don't know a whole lot about Access. I'm trying, though. For some time I've been using an Access database that I created for my own use at work. I do investigations and needed something to help me track my cases. Is "dirty" and "bloated" but works for me. After many years, my fellow workers noticed that I can reboot a PC with "Ctrl-Alt-Del",and now they think I'm an expert. It didn't take them long to learn about my "dirty" and "bloated" "tracking "system". Now they want the great "tool". With the help of you guys, I learned to do some tricks so I could share the "tracking "system". However, there are two things that I just can't grasp the concept. First, I don't want "my users" (sounds great, ah!) meddling with the design. Second, if they want to enter a new record, I don't want them to use the little arrow with the asterisk. You know, the one that is in the bar that allows you to navigate. Any help with these two issues will be deeply appreciated. I might even get a pay raise! Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Plutonium Lounger
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    Re: Keep Users Legal (Access 2K)

    There are basically two ways you can protect the design of a database:

    1) You can create an .mde database from your .mdb database (Tools | Database Utilities | Make MDE File...), and make the .mde available to your users. You should keep the .mde database, for if you want to change the design of a form, report or module, you must do so in the .mdb database, then create a new .mde database and distribute it. This works best in a split frontend-backend design, which is a good idea anyway - see WendellB's tutorial Why Split a Database?.

    2) You can apply user-level security. This lets you define different users with different permissions, for example a designer who can change the design of database objects, and end-users who can only enter, edit and view data.
    User-level security looks rather intimidating at first, but it's not as bad as it seems. See WendellB's tutorial The Secrets of Security for an introduction and useful links.

    If you don't want the users to be able to create a new record, set the Allow Additions property of the form to No (users should only enter/edit/view data through a form, never directly in a table or query). If you want them to be able to create a new record, but not through the New Record button in the navigation bar, set the Navigation Buttons property of the form to No, and provide your own command buttons to move forwar and backward, and to create a new record.

  3. #3
    Platinum Lounger
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    Re: Keep Users Legal (Access 2K)

    I will answer part of your question.

    To allow users the ability to to Data Entry Only on a specific form you have to change the properties of the form.

    1) Open the form in design view
    2) Click the top left corner and select Properties of the form
    3) Select the Data Tab
    4) Select Yes from Data Entry
    5) Save

    This will only create a new , empty form when they open it.
    Jerry

  4. #4
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    Re: Keep Users Legal (Access 2K)

    Thanks to HansV and Jeeza. I'll let you know how it goes. The best to you!

  5. #5
    4 Star Lounger SteveH's Avatar
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    Re: Keep Users Legal (Access 2K)

    You might find <!post=this post,515889>this post<!/post> has a few useful tips/pointers to help you on your way and to avoid some of the most common problems. (Shameless plug!)
    Steve H
    IT Lecturer/Access Developer
    O2K SR3/O2010; Win7Pro

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