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  1. #1
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    File Extract Locations

    I was recently having a problem with extracting the 272 MB Windows XP 2 Service Pack file.

    The download would go fine, but when I'd double click on it, it would extract for a while, then all of a sudden halt with a "File is corrupt" message. I figured out the problem, but it does lead to another question.

    I have two internal drives (C,D) and a USB External Drive (E). Files were always being extracted to my USB E drive. As I was having problems with that drive (actually with the USB connection), I figured out that the extraction process was failing due to that, not due to the downloaded file being corrupt.

    I unplugged the drive, and the file then extracted normally to my D drive.

    My question is - do self extracting files like the SP2 file always chose the highest available drive letter for extraction? Is there any way to control which drive the files extract to, short of making the drive (like my E drive) unavailable?

    Not a vital question, just curious if anyone knows.

    John

  2. #2
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    Re: File Extract Locations

    Where did you save the downloaded file?

    I have found that if I save a downloaded zipped file to my USB drive, then the unzipping application wants to put the unzipped files on that dirve as well. If that is the case for you, then its possible that the unzipping failed because there was insufficient space on your USB drive.

    Just a thought

  3. #3
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    Re: File Extract Locations

    IIRC, the service pack installer checks disks for available storage before beginning the extraction. If the USB drive had the most available that could be why it was selected.

    Joe
    Joe

  4. #4
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    Re: File Extract Locations

    I agree with Joe, it's about most free space

    Not specific to the SP, but I have seen this several times with MS updates for Windows. I.e. when running the self-extracting update (and after accepting the EULA), when it extracts the package a randomly created folder name will flash by on the install dialog box.

    In my case I have quite plenty of space on my system drive/partition C, around 15 GB free. The update package is stored and run from a smaller partition E, let's say 2 GB free; still a temporarily folder is created during install on F (such as F:626f201416aac30c53ff730d65fd37), this partition has around 50 GB free. When the installation has finished, the temp. folder is removed.

    So, even if it is a tiny 6oo kB update, the Package Installer chooses my largest partition (which, in my case, happen to have the highest drive letter). It has nothing to do with the drive letter, but most free space. A bit silly if a small update, but as long as it removes the temp. folder in a nice way, I don't complain.

    Yes, updates, SP's et al can be run with switches. So if one like, one can force the extraction to a certain folder/drive. (such as: /extractath_name; ex. "Package_name.exe /extractSPupdate". This will however not start the Package Installer, just extract.

    If no switches, normal case auto-extraction and start installation, if I quote from MS documentation at Tech Library (my emphasis):
    <hr>When you run the executable file for the package, its contents are extracted into a temporary extraction directory. The location of that directory can be randomly generated by the package installer, or you can specify it as part of a command-line option. If you do not specify a path, the package installer determines which drive on the local fixed disks has the most disk space. It then uses a Windows application programming interface (API) to generate a random name for the extraction directory and places the directory at the root of the drive. For more information, see Extracting Update Package Contents Prior to Deployment.<hr>
    See: The Package Installer (Formerly Called Update.exe) for Microsoft Windows Operating Systems and Windows Components

    For extraction quote, look under Installation Overview, for command-line switches, manual extraction etc. see Deploying Your Software Updates.

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