CES report: Far more than tablets and 3-D TV

Michael lasky
By Michael Lasky

Windows takes a back-row seat to everything Apple or tablet.

Or so it would seem. But beyond the hype, there was a wealth of interesting technology on display at CES.

What was not on display at this year’s Las Vegas Consumer Electronics Show revealed as much about PC trends as what was. Desktop and notebook PCs are no longer among the bellwethers of future electronics — CES was all about an onslaught of Apple iPad–wannabes. You’d think it was the death knell of the common PC.

(For additional coverage of CES, see our Best Hardware story, “The best-kept hardware secrets of CES 2011” in the paid section of the newsletter.)

What’s clear: tablets will have a profound effect on the still-popular notebook PC category — and might spell the end of the recently revived netbook machines. Lenovo’s display of new products was a case in point: perhaps seeing the digital writing on the wall, the company introduced a legion of new ThinkPad notebooks and business tablets but no netbooks.

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Michael Lasky

About Michael Lasky

WS contributing editor Michael Lasky is a freelance writer based in Oakland, California, who has 20 years of computer-magazine experience, most recently as senior editor at PC World.