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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruirib View Post
    The fact that you don't get an IP assigned is weird, even without the AP, which leads me to thing the issue may be with the router. Just for testing, what if you set an IP lease to expire in a rather short interval (say 5 mins) and you roam near the end of the interval?
    BTW, the router was a replacement for a unit that was dropping connections. It's brand new and the chances of my having received two lemons from TP-Link in a row are pretty remote (I think!).

  2. #17
    WS Lounge VIP Browni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melvynm View Post
    Firstly, the two devices are connected via a cable so I was under the impression that "Bridge Mode" is inappropriate.
    Doesn't matter how the devices are connected.

    Bridging a box simply turns it into a passive device where all traffic is passed on to a connected router which will be responsible for DHCP etc.

    The fact that you can't get a valid IP address when roaming (upstairs!) suggests that both boxes are using DHCP where only one should do in the same network.

    Another option I noticed was to use the AP as a repeater. Have you tried that?

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Browni View Post
    The fact that you can't get a valid IP address when roaming (upstairs!) suggests that both boxes are using DHCP where only one should do in the same network.
    This isn't entirely accurate. If I move between the devices in either direction I don't get an IP. Also, DHCP is definitely disabled on the AP.Regardless, I'll try "Bridge with AP" mode.
    Quote Originally Posted by Browni View Post
    Another option I noticed was to use the AP as a repeater. Have you tried that?
    I thought that Repeater mode also requires that the devices communicate wirelessly. Am I wrong? What about Client mode?

  4. #19
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    Have you solved the issue? How?

    Thanks.

  5. #20
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    No solution. I gave up. Returned the AP and bought two of these for the back of my router:
    http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-ANT.../dp/B004UBUE2O
    Coverage isn't perfect but it's better than before.

  6. #21
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    I have got some support from TP-LINK but no fix yet.

    I currently improved the situation as follows:

    Floor-3: W8961ND; connected to Internet, Access Point DISABLED (no Wifi in Floor3), connected to Powerline PA251.

    Floor-2: WA701 Access Point connected to Powerline PA251. SSID:2

    Floor-1: PA281 SSID:1

    All have different SSID's with AES security. Passwords are same. TPLINK Support person said the SSID's all must be same. I will try.

    Channels all different and I tried to arrange the channels so that they don't interfere with each other and less interfered with the the neighbours. I used Wifi Analyser on my phone to see the possible neighboring devices.

    I can roam between Floor-1 and Floor-2 now. Very good.

    But:

    If I open the Access Point of W8961ND, and if I was previously connected to Floor-1 or Floor-2; I can NOT connect to W8961. It takes forever ! W8961 has SSID:3 and same password.

    I assume the problem is with W8961ND Firmware ! It needs an update or something ! Or something else I still could not figure out.

    I have not tried with the same SSID. I will give a try. I had tried previous but failed, but I will make sure a double check again.

    You can also set roaming aggressiveness in notebook for better and faster roaming. However there is no option in iPAD for that.

    So, except the floor-3 (which W8961 there), I have very good roaming now. Trying to solve the issue of W8961 now. Otherwise I have some signal from floor-3 anyway and I have ethernet connection already.

    By the way, connecting these all Access Points over Powerline is great ! In long term, we will see if they survive.

  7. #22
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    Firstly I'm new so sorry if I have inadvertently failed to follow any forum protocols but I don't think I'm hijacking a thread or anything like that.
    I've just found this thread in September 2013 and would like to know if ferdhat found an answer because I seem to be in the same situation as him/her and melvynm.
    I live in the UK and at one end of my house have Virgin Cable Broadband, an old NTL (Now Virgin) modem feeding a Virgin supplied D-Link DIR615 router, from this one output port is connected to a desktop PC and another output port goes to a switch elsewhere in the house via CAT5E cable, there are feeds from this to various rooms including one to a bedroom where there is a second switch of which one port goes to a Smart TV and another to a TP-Link WA801ND Wireless Access Point. I don't think the switches are significant because I've also connected from the Router to the Access Point directly with the same problem. Just as melvynm found, a strong signal in the bedroom and internet for a while then no Internet, but still a strong signal, in a rather unpredictable manner - at times it would disable the internet to the desktop too, requiring a router reset. At present (and I pray it will last) it is working by using different SSIDs for the router and the wireless access point, which makes no sense to me and all the details I've read say that this shouldn't be needed and causes, obviously, a need to change network on mobile phones and the like at different ends of the house. I'd welcome feedback.

  8. #23
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    Four years later, but I'm sure people are still reading this thread.

    Having very similar problems to those described by ferhatd & SittingRoomSitter. I have the following setup:

    Internet----router----switch(router in switch mode)&AP1----AP2

    AP1 & AP2 are both setup up with the same SSID, same security, tried same channel and different channels. Devices can connect to either and they appear as one in the access point list and all works fine. When you connect to one and then roam to the other, you lose network connectivity but still shows as connected to network.

    Anyone found a solution for this yet?

  9. #24
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    I would always use a different channel for the second AP to help avoid external interference - if one is unhappy the other should be OK.

    How do you know you are roaming between the units?
    When you lose connectivity can you still connect to local devices? Ping the router or one of the APs.
    Are the APs using different IPs outside the DHCP range?
    Do the APs have a DHCP server and is it off.

    cheers, Paul

  10. #25
    WS Lounge VIP mrjimphelps's Avatar
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    I have found one disadvantage in using the same SSID for two access points: Your computer might latch on to the weaker signal (if both signals are available) and stay there (i.e. it won't move to the stronger signal). I didn't know if that could be fixed, so I just went with two SSIDs.

    Here are two other things I discovered, in case anyone can benefit from the information:
    1. If your router is set to auto select the best channel, your access point might lose the connection when the channels are switched. To fix this, set the router to stay on the same channel all the time.
    2. If you have a space in the SSID, some devices won't be able to log on to the router. For example, "football fan" might not work, but "footballfan" should have no problem.

    One other thing: Whenever I select an SSID, I pick a non-descript name. For example, "footballfan" is non-descript, whereas "mrjimphelps" would tell anyone looking at the available wireless networks that it is my network. You might have a neighbor who for whatever reason has it out for you. Don't make his job any easier.

  11. #26
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    Short story - in my experience:
    1. Setting the router and all additional wireless access points (APs) to use the same SSID and password should work fine.
    2. Be aware that iOS devices are quite aggressive in grabbing DHCP-assigned IP addresses quickly so you need to take this into account.
    3. If you use wireless printer(s), set it/them to use a static IP and configure the router to use DHCP-assigned addresses above this fixed IP (because of 2 above).
    4. If your electrics allow, use 'Ethernet Over Power' (EOP) WiFi hotspots for the initial internal hop.
    5. The Powerline 'standard' turns out to not be a standard at all. Do not expect to be able to mix'n'match Powerline devices from different manufacturers.

    Background:
    I've only had to setup one of these but, following several months of trial and error, I'm pleased that 27 months on it's still working flawlessly for a family with a dozen wi-fi devices (laptops, iPads, iPhones and an iPod plus a Kindle and a shared wireless colour printer). There are also 2 PCs, 2 shared printers and 2 smart TVs, all connected via wire.

    I scanned available wi-fi channels that were in use nearby. All channels were in use so I chose the one with lowest signal strength, i.e. furthest away. (I used Wifi Analyzer running on an Android tablet but any wi-fi signal strength/channel tool will serve.)

    I set the family's router up to use that channel and changed the SSID to an easy-to-see name that didn't identify the house/family. I also set DHCP on the router to use xxx.xxx.xxx.100 upwards. I set the printers up to use fixed IPs in the xxx.xxx.xxx.30 range. This was because the house is in an area that experiences regular short but annoying power failures. I found iOS devices to be quick to recover and aggressive when it came to grabbing IPs from the router as it powered up again. Previously, when the printers came back to life they inevitably had a different DHCP-assigned IP address depending on how many iPhones or iPads were in use.

    It's a large 2-storey house with very thick walls downstairs. The family had been using Edimax WiFi repeaters but complained constantly about dropped WiFi connections. The final straw was when they bought 2 smart TVs and couldn't get a reliable electronic program guide on either.

    The house's electrics were in good condition so I decided to use 'Ethernet Over Power' (EOP) WiFi hotspots instead of the range extenders. If you're interested you can read more of the saga here but, basically, I set each of the 4 EOP WiFi hotspots to use the same SSID and password.

    I'm pleased that, 27 months on, there have been only 4 breaks in wifi connectivity, each one involving the EOP WiFi hotspot being swamped in the kitchen (where most people congregate at mealtimes, each with an iPhone and usually with an iPad and/or iPod) and each one resolved within minutes by just switching the EOP WiFi hotspot off then on again and waiting a few minutes.

    (Disclaimer - Since setting it up, I've learned that iOS devices automatically connect to the strongest signal of APs that have previously been connected to. This may be why this iOS-centric family's WiFi network works so well for them. YMMV)
    Last edited by Rick Corbett; 2017-04-01 at 23:21.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Corbett View Post
    Short story - in my experience:
    1. Setting the router and all additional wireless access points (APs) to use the same SSID and password should work fine.
    2. Be aware that iOS devices are quite aggressive in grabbing DHCP-assigned IP addresses quickly so you need to take this into account.
    3. If you use wireless printer(s), set it/them to use a static IP and configure the router to use DHCP-assigned addresses above this fixed IP (because of 2 above).
    4. If your electrics allow, use 'Ethernet Over Power' (EOP) WiFi hotspots for the initial internal hop.
    5. The Powerline 'standard' turns out to not be a standard at all. Do not expect to be able to mix'n'match Powerline devices from different manufacturers.
    Your experience sounds great. By yes, our M did V.
    We did #1 and #3.
    #4 & #5 are irrelevant to our story because we were using neither EOP nor Powerline devices.
    We still had no success. But thank you.

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