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  1. #1
    5 Star Lounger
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    Upgrading HP Stream Notebook

    Note that this is of very little interest to anyone unless they have an HP Stream Notebook (you've been warned!).

    My six-year-old granddaughter has an HP Stream Notebook PC-11 (it's pink). Her father gave it to her a couple of years ago. It came with Windows 8 installed.
    Last year I decided to upgrade it for her from Windows 8 to 8.1 and that went well. As it turned out, upgrading from Windows 8 to 8.1 was easy (by repetitively checking for updates until the update showed up). My granddaughter hardly noticed the change.
    Then this year I decided to upgrade her notebook from 8.1 to 10. This process turned out to be more complicated than I'd assumed.

    Just in case someone has an older HP Stream and is contemplating upgrading it to Windows 10, I thought I'd share this story with you. Note, however that the present cost of a new HP Stream is only around $200 and it comes with Windows 10 (if I'd known how much trouble upgrading would be I might have simply bought a new notebook!).

    Before trying to upgrade her system I searched the Internet (and HP) for documentation. I found a few forums which had references to the upgrade process but not many people seemed to have successfully done it. Some said they used an external DVD drive, some said they used a flash drive, and some mentioned nothing of the sort. It was very confusing. Nevertheless, I slogged onward and eventually succeeded.

    Here are the materials I used in upgrading an HP Stream from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 (you may not need all this):

    (1) I made a Windows 10 installation flash drive by using Microsoft's Media Creation Tool (MCT: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10).
    Since I wanted to be able to restore the system back to Windows 8.1 if anything went wrong, I first wanted to make sure I had an image, so...
    (2) I installed my favorite disk image backup software on a 4 GB flash drive and tested it.
    (3) I chose a second flash drive (128 GB) to use as a place to store future system images.
    Since the Stream only came with an internal 32GB SSD as drive C: (no hard drive) I bought a 64GB memory card for less than $30, and...
    (4) inserted it in the Stream's memory card slot (I'm keeping my eye on the price of 128GB cards).

    From memory, here are the steps I took:

    * Downloaded from HP all the Stream Notebook drivers for Windows 10 (and saved them to a flash drive).
    * Backed up the Stream's SSD onto a 128 GB flash drive (i.e., I imaged the SSD), then I set aside this image.
    * Inserted the Windows 10 installation flash drive, and started "setup"... and stepped through the options (I elected to allow updates to be downloaded during installation).
    - When the initial upgrade to Windows 10 completed there were more updates required after a reboot. That took hours.
    A couple of days later a cumulative update showed up (i.e., the Creators Update). It began downloading and seemed to take foreeeeever! Then it began to install.
    - Windows 10 informed me that additional storage space would be required so I had to free up some space on the SSD (i.e., the C: drive). (I didn't worry at this point about losing any of her documents/pictures/etc. because everything was preserved in the image I'd made.)
    After deleting a few files from drive C: (the SSD) installation continued but it soon complained again that there wasn't enough free space! This time I ran Disk Cleanup and I placed a checkmark in the appropriate box to delete the C:\Windows.old folder (i.e., left-overs from the previous OS install).
    - I didn't actually delete all her personal files, and my efforts to free up space by deleting things didn't have enough of the desired effect. The cumulative update rolled back! To complete the cumulative upgrade Windows wanted more free space!! (This was getting really frustrating.)
    So, I resorted to changing the location of her "\Users\username\Documents" folder to a location on the memory card instead of the SSD. [I also chose to move her "\videos" and "\Pictures" folders as well. I created folders as follows: E:\Documents, E:\Downloads, E:\Music, E:\Pictures, and E:\Videos (it's pretty obvious that her memory card is "E:" drive).] After this change the process finally completed; no more squawking about needing additional free space!
    (Note: If you move those locations off of the SSD and onto your memory card, you will need to keep that card in the memory card slot! The memory card becomes a permanent part of your computer!)

    It was "good to go" when the installation of Windows 10 Home completed. The downside was that it had taken several hours to upgrade!
    Days later, when I'd satisfied myself that her system was stable, I created two new images; I imaged both the SSD (which contains the "C:" partition) and the memory card (which in her case is "E:" drive). So there you have it (it may not sound bad, but it was a royal pain).

    Note that if you buy an HP Stream with Windows 10 already installed, it is still a good idea to buy a memory card and stuff it in that card reader slot! It gives you additional storage that you'll probably need eventually.

    Now that my six-year-old granddaughter has been using Windows 10 Home for a few weeks, just the other day I heard her tell someone that "Mine is just like Mommy's computer!". Her mother actually has a desktop but she, too, is running Windows 10 Home version 1703.
    Last edited by RockE; 2017-09-07 at 01:37.
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to RockE For This Useful Post:

    satrow (2017-09-07)

  3. #2
    5 Star Lounger
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    UPDATE: Yesterday I created a new version of Windows 10 installation flash drive (using the Media Creation Tool) then used it to upgrade the HP Stream to Windows 10 version 1709 (OS Build 16299.19).
    The upgrade annoyed me because the touchpad no longer worked!
    The solution was to download a driver from HP (not a Synaptic touchpad driver surprisingly!). The necessary file installed an "IO" driver (SP69101 in my particular circumstance) and the existing touchpad driver worked afterward.
    So, if your Stream has the same problem perhaps this will help.

    Device Manager displays the following (now that everything is again working properly).
    SynapticPad_DevMan2.jpg
    Clone or Image often! Backup, backup, backup, backup...
    - - - - -
    Home Built System: Windows 10 Home 64-bit, AMD Athlon II X3 435 CPU, 16GB DDR3 RAM, ASUSTeK M4A89GTD-PRO/USB3 (AM3) motherboard, 512GB SanDisk SSD, 3 TB WD HDD, 1024MB ATI AMD RADEON HD 6450 video, ASUS VE278 (1920x1080) display, ATAPI iHAS224 Optical Drive, integrated Realtek High Definition Audio

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