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  1. #16
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    I'm no IT pro, but here's a thought: Something of a software nature is tripping up the installation of updates. So, would it not be a good idea to tell Setup.exe to keep nothing that's now on my PC? Reinstalling my software (Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat Reader, for example) is no big deal. Y'think that'd work?

  2. #17
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    Check your version number.

  3. #18
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    I would agree with dogberry, i.e. check your version no.

    1. Click on the Cortana search box and enter winver.
    2. Let us know the info shown at a and b.

    winver1.png
    Click to enlarge

    Your edition (a) is most likely Windows Home... it's the build (b) info that's more important at this moment.

    IMO the jury's still out on build 1709 (see this post from Woody) so if you are already on build 1703 then I would stay with it for the moment.

    There's currently an issue where 1703 users are now getting 1709 even if they don't want it... so the upgrade waters are currently very murky.

    (There's also a big kerfuffle around kernel updates and I suggest it may be an idea to wait for the dust to settle before you allow any Windows updates at all.)

    Another possible reason to stay with what you have is that build 1709 may just not be compatible with a 10-yr-old laptop so you would just get stuck in a 'reverting to previous version' loop.

    I'm aware that it's not the preferred method advocated by Woody and others but what's worked for me is to go into Services and disable the ones concerning Windows update and only re-enable them when you're ready.

    I have a batch file which does this automatically but it depends on which build you have. For example, for 1703 I use the batch file shown here.

    Post back if you are interested in this way of curtailing Windows Update for the moment.

  4. #19
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    Yep—Win10 Home, version 1703. I'll happily stay with 1703 for the time being, as long as I can keep the system from trying over and over to install an update that won't install. FWIW, I got this error: 0xC1900101 - ox3000D—"The installation failed in the FIRST_BOOT phase with an error during MIGRATE_DATA operation."

    Seems to me that the setup would detect that my aging laptop can't handle 1709, but ... why should anyone be surprised?

    Yes, please, Rick—I'd like to know how to curtail Windows Update (temporarily, of course). Thanks!

  5. #20
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Hutton
    Yep—Win10 Home, version 1703. I'll happily stay with 1703 for the time being, as long as I can keep the system from trying over and over to install an update that won't install. FWIW, I got this error: 0xC1900101 - ox3000D—"The installation failed in the FIRST_BOOT phase with an error during MIGRATE_DATA operation."
    One reason for that error may be lack of free disk space. However, even if you do clear space by - for example - deleting temporary file, emptying the Recycle Bin, turning off Hibernation and disabling System Protection (Restore Points), I still wouldn't personally install 1709 at this point.

    One thing to note is that with build 1703, a new download/upload service called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO) was introduced. WUDO appears to be much more aggressive than the previously used BITS service (although BITS remains as a fallback method).

    I mention this because it's the most likely culprit to have affected your streaming. You can easily check by stopping the Delivery Optimization service and checking whether the streaming has improved. If you DO stop Delivery Optimization then it's likely that BITS will start to carry out network transfer instead... but it's a more gentle service that may co-exist alongside any streaming without adverse effects. You can of course stop BITS as well.

    The method I use is to stop and disable four Windows Update services.

    Pros:
    • It's quick and easy to implement.
    • Does not affect the updating of Windows Defender, e.g. definition updates.
    • It's quick and easy to remove when no longer needed.
    • Prevents (so far) Microsoft from undoing your choices in favour of their own (which has happened with other methods which MS have just ignored/changed).

    Cons:
    • When you open Settings and click on Update & security the dialog will open then freeze then close. (But it's easy to workaround.*)
    • Disabling the Windows Update service prevents the update history from being displayed. (But it's easy to workaround.*)
    • Scripts that check Windows Updates, history, etc. will fail. (But it's easy to workaround.*)

    1. Create a folder called Support in the root of C:\ (i.e. C:\Support).
    2. Download and unzip the contents of WU1703.zip to C:\Support.
      wu1703_unzipped.jpg
      Click to enlarge
    3. Copy (or Move) the Windows Update as Admin shortcut to your desktop. It should appear like this:
      wu_as_admin_icon.jpg
    4. Just to check all's gone well, right-click on the icon and choose Properties at the bottom of the context menu.
    5. When the Properties dialog opens, click on the Advanced button (shown as a) and check there's a tick in the Run as administrator checkbox (shown as b).
      wu_as_admin_properties.jpg
    6. Close the dialogs.

    Now to use it:

    1. Double-click on the Windows Update as Admin shortcut on your desktop.
    2. When the User Account Control (UAC) dialog appears, click on the Yes button to allow the .BAT file to run as administrator.
      uac_for_wu_bat.jpg
      (Note: The .BAT file won't work properly unless it's run with elevated privileges.)
    3. A Windows Update as Admin commandline dialog will appear and (assuming the default states of the 4 services haven't already been changed) you will see the following, with each of the 4 services showing as 'aleady started'. This is quite normal and will only happen the first time the .BAT file is run.
      wu_bat_first_run.jpg
      Click to enlarge
      Note the wording at the end, i.e. Press any key to continue. Don't do anything for the moment.
    4. The Settings dialog will appear automatically, already set to the Windows Update page.
    5. Do whatever you want to do (Check for updates, check the update history, etc.) then close the Settings dialog.
    6. Click in/on the Windows Update as Admin commandline dialog's titlebar to ensure it's the active window then... press any key.
    7. The .BAT file will continue processing commands and you will see the 4 services being stopped and disabled:
      wu_bat_continue.jpg
      Click to enlarge
    8. The commandline dialog will then automatically exit and disappear from view.

    That's it. It may not be the solution for everyone but it's worked well for me since version 1604 so I'm back in control of when my Windows 10 installs are updated. I've just had to amend the .BAT file as Microsoft changes the playing field.

    *Just remember you need to run the .BAT file first before opening the Windows Update page in Settings (or running any kind of script that checks Windows Updates, history, etc.).

    Background info:
    The four services are:
    • Windows Update (Display name) aka wuaserv (Service name) - Standard update mechanism.
    • Delivery Optimization (Display name) aka dosvc (Service name) - Aggressive download/upload service. There are many reports of WUDO apparently swamping network bandwidth leaving little or nothing left for other network activity. Not only does it use multiple connections to download updates, it also uploads those updates to any other of your own Windows devices on your local network but also to strangers' devices on the internet. This peer-to-peer behaviour can be amended from within Settings > Windows Update > Advanced Options > Choose how updates are delivered > Updates from more than one place. Toggle the setting to Off to stop uploads to other devices. (The cynical part of me believes this is to reduce Microsoft's costs for its own bandwith but MS explain that it's so we all get updates faster.)
    • Update Orchestrator Service (Display name) aka UsoSvc (Service name) - New manager of Windows Update service
    • Background Intelligent Transfer Service (Display name) aka BITS (Service name) - Less aggressive upload/download service

    If you just stop these services, don't be surprised when they are started again automatically. There are a number of scheduled tasks that appear to specifically check the states of these (and other) services. For the moment, disabling them as well prevents this.

    Hope this helps...

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Rick Corbett For This Useful Post:

    LC_Hutton (2018-01-14)

  7. #21
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    My goodness, Rick! That's a heapin' helping' of information! Thank you very much! I'll take your advice and give up on my quest to install 1709 ... for now, at least. I'll need a little time to digest this information and apply it to my system, but I'll post back and let you know how things pan out.

  8. #22
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LC_Hutton
    My goodness, Rick! That's a heapin' helping' of information! Thank you very much! I'll take your advice and give up on my quest to install 1709 ... for now, at least. I'll need a little time to digest this information and apply it to my system, but I'll post back and let you know how things pan out.
    From creating the C:\Support folder and unpacking the contents of the ZIP file to running the .BAT file from the shortcut for the first time to set it all up takes just a few minutes... a lot less than reading all I wrote.

    The explanation/instructions may be lengthy but it's all very simple really.

  9. #23
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    Quite right, Rick! It was all very quick and easy. (Sorry for the slow response, but I was indisposed for a day or two.) For now, it appears that live TV streaming is working better. Still some stuttering, but that's no surprise with an inexpensive system that was built ten years ago. I appreciate the support!

  10. #24
    Administrator Rick Corbett's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting back. I'm glad to hear it helped a little. No doubt there are other services/processes which can be amended to further improve performance. Post back if that's of any interest to you.

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